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education > Programs and Curriculum

Educator in Motion
VIRTUAL PROGRAMS SUPPORTING ONLINE/DISTANCE LEARNING ARE AVAILABLE

The Educator in Motion program is a FREE school and community outreach program that provides educational programming on the Holocaust, Human Rights, and Active Citizenship in school and community settings. 

Students work directly with a museum educator and participate in interactive activities that explore the lessons of the Holocaust, social justice throughout history, and the role of individuals in society today. Integrating social studies, language arts, and fine arts concepts, EIM programs enhance student content knowledge and critical thinking skills while supporting the development of individual and civic responsibility in K-12 classrooms.

This year, in response to the increased need for virtual instruction options, the Educator in Motion program is pleased to offer FREE virtual programs to support educators and students engaged in online/remote learning. Virtual EIM programs can be adapted to fit your classroom schedule and include live presentation options to support synchronous learning or prerecorded presentation options to support asynchronous learning. Virtual EIM programs can be presented in English or Spanish and are in alignment with Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS) standards.

For more information or to schedule a virtual program for your campus, please email education@hmh.org or call 713-527-1611.

Holocaust Museum Houston would like to thank the following donors for their generous support of the Educator in Motion program: A.D. Players at The George Theater, CenterPoint Energy, Frances and Louis Gordon Endowment Fund, The Ronald Grabois Family Fund, Chris Henrich, Sandra G. and Richard A. Jackson Charitable Fund, Nicole and Glenn Lowenstein, Jerry Rochman, Polly and David Roth Fund, Barbara Sasser, and Walmart Stores, Inc.

Photo credit: © St. Mary’s Dominican High School

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2020-2021 VIRTUAL PROGRAM OPTIONS

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ELEMENTARY SCHOOL PROGRAMS (GRADES PRE-K - 5)

“Building Upstanders: The Power of Kindness, Empathy, and Inclusion”
Through interactive readings and guided discussions, students examine the powerful impact kindness, empathy, and inclusion can have in the lives of others and the importance of using our voices to stand up for others. This program includes an art project in which students create their own “sensory figure,” an activity that supports literacy and social studies skills, to review what they learned. This program is best suited for grades Pre-K-5.

“All Behaviors Count”
In the ABC program, students will consider how harmful behaviors (taunting, rumoring, exclusion, ganging up and bullying) affect everyday experiences in school settings. Through interactive discussions, videos, and activities, students learn to identify these harmful behaviors, develop skills and strategies to help them intervene as empowered Upstanders, and brainstorm actions they can take to build positive and inclusive communities today. This program is appropriate for grades Pre-K-5. 

“Change Makers: Upstanders in American History”
Using children’s literature, participants will explore the stories of Upstanders in American history who used their voices to promote equality, justice, and respect for all. Change Makers include Rosa Parks, Dolores Huerta, W.W. Law, Audrey Faye Hendricks, Cesar Chavez, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Sylvia Mendez, and other social justice advocates who stood up for equal rights. This program includes an art project in which students create their own “sensory figure,” an activity that supports literacy and social studies skills, to review and present on what they learned. This program is best suited for grades 3-5.

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MIDDLE/HIGH SCHOOL PROGRAMS (GRADES 6 – 12)

“Images of the Holocaust”
Using photographs, film, eyewitness testimony, and interactive activities, students gain a historical overview of the Holocaust from the rise of the Nazi Party to the end of World War II. This program is best suited for students with limited to moderate knowledge of the Holocaust and is appropriate for grades 6–12.

“Personal Narratives of the Holocaust”
Through diaries, poetry, and video testimony, students explore the personal stories and experiences of Jewish men, women, and children throughout the Holocaust. This program includes an optional creative writing exercise in which students create a written piece in response to what they learned. This program is best suited for students who understand the core facts of the Holocaust and is appropriate for grades 6 –12.

“The Jewish Refugee Crisis and the World’s Response”
Students will examine the obstacles and challenges of Jewish emigration under the Nazi regime and the ensuing refugee crisis in Europe prior to the outbreak of WWII. This program includes an interactive activity in which students explore the international community’s response to the Jewish refugee crisis using political cartoons and surveys/polls from the 1930s. This program is best suited for students who understand the core facts of the Holocaust and is appropriate for grades 6 –12.

“The Possibility of Individual Choice: Upstanders during the Holocaust”
Students will explore stories of rescue and resistance during the Holocaust and the courageous individuals whose actions saved lives during a time of injustice. This program also features stories of modern day Upstanders and an interactive activity that encourages students to consider what it means to be an Upstanders in the world today. This program is best suited for students who understand the core facts of the Holocaust and is appropriate for grades 5–12.

“The Possibility of Individual Choice: Rescue in the Philippines”
Using the film “Rescue in the Philippines: Refuge from the Holocaust,” students will discover the remarkable story of how the Frieder brothers – five Cincinnati businessmen who owned a family business in pre-WWII Manila – together with Manuel Quezon, Paul McNutt, and Army Colonel Dwight Eisenhower helped 1,300 Jews escape the Nazis to find refuge in the Philippines. This program includes an interactive activity in which students create “mosaics,” an activity that supports literacy and social study skills, in response to what they learned. This program is best suited for students who understand the core facts of the Holocaust and is appropriate for grades 5–12.

“Art of the Holocaust”
Through the analysis and interpretation of artwork created by Jewish artists in ghettos and in concentration camps, students will consider the role of artwork during times of injustice and how these visual voices shed light on the personal experiences of Jewish men, women, and children throughout the Holocaust. This program includes an optional art project in which students will create their own artwork in response to what they learned. This program can be tailored for students with limited to extensive knowledge of the Holocaust and is appropriate for grades 6–12.

“Contemporary Genocides”
Beginning with a historical overview of genocides prior to the Holocaust, students will examine and analyze the United Nation’s Genocide Convention as well as the advantages and challenges of this document. This program includes an interactive activity in which students investigate case studies after the Holocaust and determine if a genocide occurred there according to the UN Genocide Convention. This program is best suited for students who have completed a unit of study on the Holocaust or are working on a post-World War II unit and is appropriate for grades 9-12. Please note: portions of the documents can be graphic in nature given the subject matter.

“Human Rights: Principles, Challenges, and Advocacy”
Students are introduced to the evolution of human rights throughout history and the development of international laws and advocacy in the aftermath of the Holocaust. Using photographs, videos, and text resources, students survey the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and research Upstanders who have promoted human rights through their advocacy work. This program is best suited for students who have completed a unit of study on the Holocaust or are working on a post-World War II unit and is appropriate for grades 6-12. 

“All Behaviors Count”
The ABC program examines the five forms of social cruelty—taunting, rumoring, exclusion, ganging up, and bullying—and uses contemporary commercials, storytelling, and poetry to highlight the negative impact these behaviors can have on targeted individuals. Through guided discussions and interactive activities, students  learn to identify and respond to social cruelty as empowered Upstanders and develop skills that will help them create positive, inclusive spaces for all. This program is appropriate for grades Pre-K-12.