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2018 Events

Americans and the Holocaust with Dr. Daniel Greene
December 6, 2018 6:30 PM - 8:00 PM
Location Albert and Ethel Herzstein Theater
 

Northwestern University history professor Dr. Daniel Greene curated the exhibition, "Americans and the Holocaust," which opened earlier this year at the US Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington, DC. The exhibition dispels some of history's myths and misconceptions, including that Americans "knew nothing" about the threat of Nazism during the 1930s and '40s. Greene will discuss the process of creating the exhibition, examine Americans' responses to Nazism and ask why rescue of Jews never became a priority for most Americans.

Co-sponsored by the Edith and Sidney Goldensohn Fund of the ADL Fund for the Future of the Southwest Region.


 
 
 
Conversation with a Survivor
December 5, 2018 6:30 PM - 8:00 PM
Location Albert and Ethel Herzstein Theater
 

November 9, 2018 marked the 80th anniversary of the November Pogrom known as Kristallnacht. During the November Pogrom, Nazi thugs went through the streets of Germany and, in plain view, set synagogues on fire, smashed the window fronts of Jewish businesses, attacked Jewish people and vandalized their apartments. Houston Holocaust survivor, Ruth Steinfeld experienced the November Pogrom first hand. Ruth and her sister Lea lived in Sinsheim, Germany when Hitler came to power. The family was deported to the Gurs interment camp in 1940, and their mother was faced with a very difficult decision: to let a Jewish philanthropic organization called Oeuvres de Secours aux Enfants (OSE) take her daughters to safety, or keep them with her. Ruth and her sister's lives were forever altered after that moment.

Holocaust Museum Houston's young professional group, NEXTGen, is honored to have Ruth Steinfeld share her story at NEXTGen's Conversation with a Survivor. This annual event gives young professionals the opportunity to meet Holocaust survivors living in the Houston area and learn through firsthand accounts the dangers of hatred, prejudice and apathy. This special event is in collaboration with the Museum's current traveling exhibition, In the Country of Numbers, where the men have no names, on view through May 2019.

Cookies for the event are generously donated by SMOOSH Cookies.


 
 
 
Guatemalan Migration to the U.S.: Transnational Challenges
November 13, 2018 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM
Location Albert and Ethel Herzstein Theater
 

Join Holocaust Museum Houston for a lecture by Dr. Nestor Rodriguez, professor of sociology at The University of Texas at Austin. His research and publications include the topics of unauthorized immigration in the U.S., the migration of unaccompanied minors, border enforcement policies, migrant deaths at the U.S.-Mexico border and conditions of return migration to Mexico and Central America. His most recent publications include, "Deportation and Return in a Border-Restricted World: Experiences in Mexico, El Salvador, Guatemala, and Honduras (2017)," co-edited with Bryan Roberts and Cecilia Menjívar.

At this time in HMH's history, we work to create inclusive relationships with Houston's varied communities, including our Guatemalan neighbors. It is important to recognize that Guatemala opened a Holocaust museum in June 2018, one of the recent new museums in the world. Survivors of the Holocaust found refuge there post-war, and the Museum's esteemed colleague and respective scholar Father Patrick Debois and his organization, Yahad-in Unum, held an international conference about the role of the police in the Holocaust in Guatemala in May 2018, sponsored by the USHMM and UNESCO. Additionally, Guatemala is one of the countries the Museum will work with to bring educators from to Houston in 2020 for the Silverman Institute. Dr. Nestor Rodriguez will play a role in helping the HMH community to understand more clearly our connections to Guatemala and the challenges our two countries face around immigration.

In this lecture, Rodriguez explores the escalation of social unrest in Guatemala in the late 1970s and early 1980s that marked the beginning of large-scale Guatemalan migration to the United States. The migration has undergone several stages that differ by the volume and conditions of migration, as well as by the development of Guatemalan and other Central American immigrant communities in the United States. U.S. immigration policy facilitated legal immigration for some Guatemalans in the late 1980s and early 1990s, but since the late 1990s U.S. policy has increased the restriction of Central American immigration. While a large number of Guatemalans live in the United States with permanent visas and citizenship, in many cities in the country, the largest numbers of Guatemalan immigrants live and work with unauthorized status. Women and unaccompanied migrant children are the most vulnerable Guatemalan migrants on the journey north, and each year a number of Guatemalan migrants have died attempting to reach the United States.

Admission is free and open to the public, but advance registration is required.


 
 
 
In the Country of Numbers, where the Men have no Names Opening Reception
November 8, 2018 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM
Location 9220 Kirby Dr., Suite 100, Houston, TX 77054
 

Join Holocaust Museum Houston for the opening reception of In the Country of Numbers, where the Men have no Names. The exhibit tells the story of 6,000 Jewish men, most from Berlin, who were imprisoned in Sachsenhausen following the November Pogrom Night known as Kristallnacht. November 9, 2018 marks the 80th anniversary of the Pogrom Night in 1938 when Nazis went through the streets of Germany and set synagogues on fire, smashed the window fronts of Jewish businesses, attacked Jewish people and vandalized their apartments. Well over 1,300 Jewish women and men were killed during the riots or as a direct consequence of them. Much less attention, however, is given to the over 27,000 Jewish men throughout Germany who were arrested after the riots and taken to concentration camps. Over 80 perished in Sachsenhausen, the rest were released by the spring of 1939 on condition they would leave Germany immediately. 

Professor Jason W. Levy will give remarks at 6:30 p.m. Levy is the grandson of Julius Nathan, a survivor of the November Pogrom and Sachsenhausen whose oral testimony is featured in the exhibit.

In the Country of Numbers, where the Men have no Names is a joint project of the Sachsenhausen Memorial and Museum, the Capital Cultural Fund and the Axel Springer Foundation.


 
 
 
"In the Name of Humanity: The Secret Deal to End the Holocaust" with Author Max Wallace
November 7, 2018 7:30 PM - 9:00 PM
Location Evelyn Rubenstein Jewish Community Center 5601 S Braeswood Blvd. Houston, TX 77096
 

Holocaust historian and New York Times bestselling author, Max Wallace's latest piece derives from a riveting collection of recently declassified documents, and an account from the only living eyewitness, to the mystery behind why Heinrich Himmler demolished Auschwitz's crematoria and gas chambers - the largest killing machine in human history. An edict that has puzzled historians for more than six decades comes to light through an astonishing story involving secret negotiations of an unlikely trio - the unsung angels - who foiled the Final Solution.

Holocaust Museum Houston is a proud partner for this event during the Ann and Stephen Kaufman Jewish Book & Arts Festival.

Tickets: $12 JCC Members | $18 Public


 
 
 
"The Number on Great-Grandpa's Arm" - Film Screening
October 28, 2018 3:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Location Albert and Ethel Herzstein Theater
 

Join the Houston Holocaust Survivors and Descendants, together with Holocaust Museum Houston, for an innovative program for children ages 7-13. View the award-winning HBO film "The Number on Great-Grandpa's Arm," followed by group discussions and tools to continue the conversation at home. In "The Number on Great-Grandpa's Arm," a conversation between a boy and his great-grandfather, an Auschwitz survivor, is woven with historical footage and animation to tell a heartbreaking story of Jewish life in Eastern Europe, sharing lessons from the Holocaust with a new generation. Children are invited to attend with a parent(s) or grandparent(s). The program is open to interested families, whether or not your family includes Holocaust survivors. 


 
 
 
Why We Fight (HBO Series, Band of Brothers, Episode 9, 55 min, USA 2001)
October 18, 2018 6:30 PM - 8:00 PM
Location 9220 Kirby Dr., Suite 100
 

"Band of Brothers" is a ten-part video series dramatizing the history of one company of American paratroopers in World War II - E Company, 506th Regiment, 101st Airborne, known as "Easy Company." Band of Brothers depicts not only the heroism of their exploits but also the extraordinary bond among men formed in the crucible of war.

In the ninth episode, titled "Why We Fight," Easy Company finally enters Germany in April 1945, finding very little resistance as they proceed. There they are impressed by the industrious of the defeated locals and gain respect for their humanity. But the G.I.s are then confronted with the horror of an abandoned Nazi concentration camp in the woods, which the locals claim not to have known anything about. Here the story of Easy Company is connected with the broader narrative of the war - the ideology of the Third Reich and Hitler's plan to exterminate the Jews.

One of the Museum's educators will lead a discussion after the screening.


 
 
 
Conversation with a Texas Liberator
October 17, 2018 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM
Location Albert and Ethel Herzstein Theater
 

Texas Liberators and descendants will share their stories in a special event led by moderator and HMH Board member, David Bell. After the discussion, Liberators and descendants will answer questions from the audience.

Holocaust Museum Houston's young professional group, NEXTGen, is excited to host this event in collaboration with the exhibition, "The Texas Liberator: Witness to the Holocaust," on view through October 28, 2018.


 
 
 
Film Screening: Cuatro Puntos Cardinales (Four Cardinal Points)
October 15, 2018 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM
Location 9220 Kirby Dr., Suite 100
 

Join Holocaust Museum Houston for a screening of the documentary, "Cuatro Puntos Cardinales," followed by a Q&A session with the film's director, Javier Kafie. This documentary portrays stories from El Salvador. This film shows the cultural, social and ecological diversity of the region. From surfing communities to coffee plantations, from ex-guerrilla warzones to towns that live almost entirely on handicrafts; in such a small country as El Salvador, there's plenty to see and many stories to tell.

Director Javier Kafie (Mexico City, 1982) grew up between Mexico, Central America and the United States, finishing a degree in Literary, Cultural and Media Studies at the University of Siegen, Germany. In 2011, he directed the short documentary, "Perkin." In 2014, he produced the documentary, "El Salvador: Cuatro Puntos Cardinales," and the fictional short film, "Perfect Together." In 2015, he wrote and produced "Nothing," winner of the Short Fiction category in the ICARO Central American Film Festival. He lives in San Salvador and works as a writer and filmmaker.

Admission is free and open to the public, but advance registration is required.


 
 
 
From Out of the Shadows: Latino Holocaust Liberators of World War II
October 9, 2018 6:30 PM - 8:00 PM
Location Albert and Ethel Herzstein Theater
 

Join Holocaust Museum Houston for a lecture by Dr. Jesus Jesse Esparza in which he highlights the experience of several WWII Latino soldiers from the Houston area who contributed to the Allied victory and who played a role also in ending one of the most heinous and atrocious crimes against humanity, the Holocaust.

When the United States entered World War II, an estimated 16 million persons would serve the Armed Forces; among them were nearly half a million Latinos. On the eve of war, most Latinos had incomes that were underneath poverty level, lived with entrenched segregation, suffered from housing and work discrimination, had little access to health care, and were offered few educational opportunities. Despite these setbacks, Latinos would serve in every branch of the U.S. Armed Forces and participate in every campaign of this conflict. From the beach invasions in North Africa to the storming of Normandy, France; Latinos were present. From the island-hopping campaigns in the Pacific to serving in wartime defense industries states-side or for the Women's Army Auxiliary Corp; Latinos were present.

The Latino soldier is distinguished as achieving the most decorations on the battlefield than any other ethno-racial group involved in this conflict. Yet, lost with the history of World War II are the experiences and accomplishments of the Latino soldier. While a growing scholarship exists on the roles Latinos played in the war, much work is still needed to fill that void.

Dr. Jesus Jesse Esparza is an Assistant professor of History in the College of Liberal Arts and Behavioral Sciences at Texas Southern University, where he taught since 2009. His area of expertise is on the history of Latinos in the United States with an emphasis on civil rights activism. Dr. Esparza is currently working on a manuscript entitled Raza Schools: Latino Educational Autonomy and Activism in Texas, 1920-1980 which offers a multiracial narrative of a Latino-owned school district in west Texas since the end of the First World War through the post-civil rights era.

Admission is free and open to the public, but advance registration is required.


 
 
 
The Book Smugglers with David E. Fishman - Ruth Vinn Hendler Lack Lecture
October 4, 2018 7:00 PM - 8:30 PM
Location Albert and Ethel Herzstein Theater
 

The Book Smugglers is the nearly unbelievable story of ghetto residents who rescued thousands of rare books and manuscripts - first from the Nazis and then from the Soviets - by hiding them on their bodies, burying them in bunkers and smuggling them across the borders. It is a tale of heroism and resistance, of friendship and romance of unwavering devotion - including the readiness to risk one's life - to literature and art. Based on Jewish, German and Soviet documents, including diaries, letters, memoirs and the author's interviews with several of the story's participants, The Book Smugglers chronicles the daring activities of a group of poets turned partisans and scholars turned smugglers in Vilna, "The Jerusalem of Lithuania." David E. Fishman is a professor of Jewish History at The Jewish Theological Seminary and the author of numerous books and articles on the history and culture of East European Jewry. There will be a book-signing after the lecture.

Funding from the Ruth Vinn Hendler Lack Lectureship Endowment Fund.

Photo Credit: University Press of New England


 
 
 
The Book Smugglers
October 4, 2018 7:00 PM - 8:30 PM
Location Albert and Ethel Herzstein Theater
 

The Book Smugglers is the nearly unbelievable story of ghetto residents who rescued thousands of rare books and manuscripts - first from the Nazis and then from the Soviets - by hiding them on their bodies, burying them in bunkers and smuggling them across the borders. It is a tale of heroism and resistance, of friendship and romance of unwavering devotion - including the readiness to risk one's life - to literature and art. Based on Jewish, German and Soviet documents, including diaries, letters, memoirs and the author's interviews with several of the story's participants, The Book Smugglers chronicles the daring activities of a group of poets turned partisans and scholars turned smugglers in Vilna, "The Jerusalem of Lithuania." David E. Fishman is a professor of Jewish History at The Jewish Theological Seminary and the author of numerous books and articles on the history and culture of East European Jewry. There will be a book-signing after the lecture.

Photo Credit: University Press of New England


 
 
 
"On Her Shoulders" - Film Screening
October 3, 2018 6:30 PM - 9:15 PM
Location Rice Cinema - Rice Media Center, 2030 University Blvd.
 

Nadia Murad, a 23-year-old Yazidi, survived genocide and sexual slavery committed by ISIS. Repeating her story to the world with the help of renowned human rights lawyer, Amal Clooney, this ordinary girl finds herself thrust onto the international stage as the voice of her people. Away from the podium, she must navigate bureaucracy, fame and people's good intentions. 

Watch the trailer.

There will be a Q&A after the screening with Murad Ismael, Executive Director of YAZDA, and Haider Elias, President of YAZDA. 

Tickets are $15 for members, $20 for non-members online and $25 onsite. The promo code for member pricing is HM2018

This event is co-sponsored by the World Affairs Council of Greater Houston.


 
 
 
This is Buchenwald: America's Encounter with the Holocaust, 1945-1995
September 20, 2018 6:30 PM - 8:30 PM
Location Albert and Ethel Herzstein Theater
 

The testimony of American military personnel has been a key source for our understanding of the experience of the last phase of Nazi genocide in Europe. This lecture examines the liberation of the massive camp complex at Buchenwald in April 1945. How did American liberators understand the horrific experience of encountering concentration camps? How did liberator memories shift over time? Finally, how did liberator testimonies contribute to broader American discussions of the Holocaust and America's role in the world?

Adam R. Seipp is a Professor of History at Texas A&M University, where his teaching and research focus on modern German history, the Holocaust, and transatlantic relations.


 
 
 
Breakfast Book Club - "Ten Dollars to Hate: The Texas Man Who Fought the Klan" by Patricia Bernstein
September 13, 2018 9:00 AM - 10:00 AM
Location IHOP 8515 West Loop S, Houston, TX 77096
 

"Ten Dollars to Hate" by Patricia Bernstein tells the story of the massive Ku Klux Klan of the 1920 - by far the most "successful" incarnation since its inception in the ashes of the Civil War - and the first prosecutor in the nation to successfully convict and jail Klan members. Dan Moody, a 29-year-old Texas district attorney, demonstrated that Klansmen could be punished for taking the law into their own hands. 

Author Patricia Bernstein will attend this event.


 
 
 
New Docent Information Session
August 27, 2018 6:00 PM - 7:30 PM
Location Albert and Ethel Herzstein Theater
 

With the expansion to more than double the size of its building at 5401 Caroline St. well underway, Holocaust Museum Houston is looking to train new docents to accommodate the myriad of new exhibitions and expected increase in visitors. Those interested in Holocaust history, art, education and committed to impacting the love of others are encouraged to attend. Bilingual Spanish speakers are strongly encouraged to attend. Prospective docents who attend the information session will learn about the docent training process, the expectations of a docent and how they can apply.

New docents will lead tours through a permanent exhibit much different that the previous one. "Bearing Witness," the Museum's permanent exhibit with personalized testimony and artifacts donated by Houston-area Holocaust Survivors, will expand with modern, interactive exhibit designs and increase the information within each unit. Both the Danish Rescue Boat and German World War II-era Railcar were moved inside the climate-controlled structure for preservation to ensure future generations of visitors and students will learn from these valuable artifacts. For the first time, all exhibit signage will be in Spanish and English, making an even greater need for Spanish-speaking docents.

For more information, interested parties can email volunteers@hmh.org.


 
 
 
Conversation with a Syrian Refugee
August 22, 2018 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM
Location Albert and Ethel Herzstein Theater
 

Meet Dayana Halawo and learn about her four-year journey to flee Syria to the United States. She left her home in Homs while the city was being bombed along with her husband and two children. Her journey led her to Damascus, Lebanon, Jordan, and Egypt before being resettled in Houston in 2016.

Holocaust Museum Houston's young professional group, NEXTGen, is excited to host this event in collaboration with our current exhibition, "The Faces of Syrian Refugees," on view through August 26, 2018.


 
 
 

Salam Neighbor (USA, 2015, 75 min, Documentary)

Directors: Zach Ingrasci & Chris Temple


August 7, 2018 6:30 PM - 8:00 PM
Location Albert and Ethel Herzstein Theater
 

Two Americans deliberately head to the edge of war, just seven miles from the Syrian border, to live among 80,000 uprooted refugees in Jordan's Za'atari refugee camp. As the first filmmakers allowed by the United Nations to register and set-up a tent inside a refugee camp, Zach and Chris plunge into the heart of the world's most pressing humanitarian crisis. From meeting Um Ali, a woman struggling to overcome personal loss and cultural barriers, to the street smart, 10-year-old Raouf, whose trauma hides just beneath his ever present smile, Zach and Chris uncover inspiring stories of individuals rallying, against all odds, to rebuild their lives and those of their neighbors.

Dayana Halawo, who fled Syria and settled in the U.S. two years ago, will answer questions after the film screening.


 
 
 
Creating Inclusive Communities Teacher Workshop
August 2, 2018 9:00 AM - 4:00 PM
Location HMH Classroom 9220 Kirby Dr., Suite 100
 

In correlation with the exhibition, "The Faces of Syrian Refugees," Holocaust Museum Houston will host a one-day education workshop for teachers in the Greater Houston area. In efforts to offer resources and information on refugee resettlement and awareness, refugee advocacy groups will work in conjunction with the HMH Education Department to provide activities, literature, and lessons that teachers can take back to their classrooms.

This workshop is open to educators who work directly with refugee students, educators learning more about the refugee experience, and/or how students can become active advocates.

Teachers from the K-5, 6-12, university and extracurricular programs (music, art, etc.) are encouraged to participate. The fee for this program is $25 per person, which includes workshop materials and lunch. Registration must take place by July 31, 2018.


 
 
 
National Delicatessen Month at Kenny and Ziggy's
August 1, 2018 11:00 AM - 9:00 PM
Location Both Kenny & Ziggy's locations
 

During National Delicatessen Month, August 1-31, both Kenny and Ziggy's New York Delicatessen & Restaurant locations are offering a multi-choice, three-course menu during lunch and dinner for $38, plus tax and gratuity, with 10 percent of each meal sold going to HMH to fund the Museum's education programs.

As an added incentive, HMH will offer anyone who purchases a National Deli Month meal a complimentary ticket, good for two entries to its temporary museum location at 9220 Kirby Dr., Suite 100.

For more information, visit www.delimonth.com


 
 
 
"All Behaviors Count" - Girl Scouts of San Jacinto Cadette Workshop
July 28, 2018 10:00 AM - 1:00 PM
Location Holocaust Museum Houston 9220 Kirby Dr., Suite 100
 

Build a vision of a better world! Take an in-depth tour of the Museum to truly understand the history behind the Holocaust and become empowered to be a positive force for change! Girls will explore historical leadership, prejudices and experiences with Holocaust Museum Houston. Cadettes will complete steps for the aMaze Journey Interact patch and Science of Happiness badge. The cost of this program is $22, which includes the badge and a snack. For more information, contact Ashley Reinhardt at areinhardt@sjgs.org or email Holocaust Museum Houston at education@hmh.org. Note: This activity is girls-only. This is a drop-off event, adults do not stay.

Register through the Girl Scouts of San Jacinto website.


 
 
 
New Docent Information Session
July 26, 2018 6:00 PM - 7:30 PM
Location Albert and Ethel Herzstein Theater
 

With the expansion to more than double the size of its building at 5401 Caroline St. well underway, Holocaust Museum Houston is looking to train new docents to accommodate the myriad of new exhibitions and expected increase in visitors. Those interested in Holocaust history, art, education and committed to impacting the lives of others are encouraged to attend. Bilingual Spanish speakers are strongly encouraged to attend. Prospective docents who attend the information session will learn about the docent training process, the expectations of a docent and how they can apply.

New docents will lead tours through a permanent exhibit much different than the previous one. "Bearing Witness," the Museum's permanent exhibit with personalized testimony and artifacts donated by Houston-area Holocaust Survivors, will expand with modern, interactive exhibit designs and increase the information within each unit. Both the Danish Rescue Boat and German World War II-era Railcar were moved inside the climate-controlled structure for preservation to ensure future generations of visitors and students will learn from these valuable artifacts. For the first time, all exhibit signage will be in Spanish and English, making an even greater need for Spanish-speaking docents.

For more information, interested parties can email volunteers@hmh.org.


 
 
 
"The Faces of Syrian Refugees" Exhibition Opening
June 21, 2018 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM
Location Mincberg Gallery
 

Experience the first look of "The Faces of Syrian Refugees" exhibition, by photographer Michael S Cohen, at Holocaust Museum Houston before it opens on Friday, June 22, 2018. "The Faces of Syrian Refugees" consists of life sized color portraits accompanied by Proust questionnaire style interviews, offering an intimate visit with 20 Syrian refugees. The exhibition will include a special feature of Houston-area Holocaust survivors who thrived after being one-time refugees in America.

Cohen's "The Faces of Syrian Refugees" consists of life sized color portraits accompanied by Proust questionnaire style interviews, offering an intimate visit with 20 Syrian refugees. After a 25-year hiatus, Cohen worked with a dozen non-profits in fields ranging from education, to felon rehabilitation to inner city youth. During this time, he watched with horror as the Syrian war escalated and the refugee crisis reached unimaginable proportions. An idea formed to travel and meet successfully resettled Syrian refugees, photograph and interview them. Since the war began in 2011, millions of Syrians have been displaced from their homes, and their country. The subjects come from all walks of life and now are engaged in everything from teaching art classes to volunteering as museum docents to conducting a Syrian expat orchestra.

During the atrocities of WWII, Holocaust survivors were uprooted from their homelands and resettled in other countries. More than one half of all European Jews perished by the end of WWII; many who survived picked up the pieces of their shattered lives and moved forward. A special feature will be included in this exhibition depicting the images and stories of several local Holocaust survivors upon their arrival in Houston prior to 1955, and how they worked hard to achieve the American dream.

You are invited to an opening reception held 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Thursday, June 21, 2018, in the Museum's Mincberg Gallery at the Morgan Family Center, just one mile south of NRG Stadium at 9220 Kirby Dr., Suite 100. Photographer Michael S Cohen will give opening remarks at 6:45 p.m. Admission is free, but advance registration is required for this reception.


 
 
 

Presentation of S.S. St. Louis for Flute

Performed by Ann Fairbanks, Music by Malcolm J. Solomon


June 17, 2018 1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Location HMH Classroom
 

Performances will start at 1:00 p.m., 2:30 p.m. and 4:00 p.m.

On May 13, 1939, just before World War II erupted, the liner St. Louis sailed from Hamburg. Aboard were 937 Jewish refugees who believed they had secured visas to enter Cuba. But a power struggle in the Cuban government voided their permission, and the St. Louis began a long, wandering journey while the U.S., France, Britain and other "sympathetic" countries wrangled over which one would accept them.

Only a fraction of the St. Louis passengers survived the war. Malcolm Solomon's objective in composing this work was to create a landscape of sound that swallows all sense and reason, representing the surrealism of the horror perpetrated against the Jewish people during World War II. Throughout the S.S. St. Louis, the flute represents the voice of the Jewish people.

Dr. Solomon is an associate professor of Jazz Ensemble at University of St. Thomas. He earned his bachelor's degree in classical composition at the University of St. Thomas, followed by both master's and doctoral degrees from Rice University.

Dr. Ann Fairbanks is a professor of Music at University of St. Thomas and a graduate of Oberlin, Yale and Ohio State University.


 
 
 
Gerald S. Kaplan Distinguished Lecture in conjunction with the Max M. Kaplan Summer Institute for Educators - "Becoming Evil: How Ordinary People Commit Genocide and Mass Atrocity" by Dr. James E. Waller
June 13, 2018 6:30 PM - 8:00 PM
Location Albert and Ethel Herzstein Theater
 

A part of the Max M. Kaplan Summer Institute held annually at the Museum, this presentation is based on over 20 years of fieldwork around the world and the publication of "Becoming Evil: How Ordinary People Commit Genocide and Mass Killing." Dr. Waller will also introduce and discuss his most recent book, "Confronting Evil: Engaging Our Responsibility to Prevent Genocide." Copies of "Becoming Evil" and "Confronting Evil" will be sold in the Museum Store and signed by Dr. Waller.

James E. Waller is the Cohen Professor of the Holocaust & Genocide Studies Chair, Department of Holocaust & Genocide Studies at Keene State College in Keene, New Hampshire. He is the Director of Academic Programs with the Auschwitz Institute for Peace and Reconciliation. Waller is a widely recognized scholar in the field of Holocaust and genocide studies and has held visiting research professorships at the Technical University in Berlin (1990), the Catholic University in Eichstatt, Germany (1992), and in the George J. Mitchell Institute for Global Peace, Justice and Security at Quenn's University in Belfast, Northern Ireland (2017). Waller has been awarded summer fellowships by, and been a teaching fellow with, the Holocaust Educational Foundation at Northwestern University (1996 and 2007-2012) and at the Center for Advanced Holocaust Studies at the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington, D.C. (1999, 2003, and 2005). He also directs, and teaches in, the biennial Summer Institute on Genocide Studies and Prevention, first held at Keene State College in 2016.

The lecture is supported by the Gerald S. Kaplan Endowment Fund.


 
 
 
Breakfast Book Club: "Defiance" by Nechama Tec

June 7, 2018 9:00 AM - 10:00 AM
Location Harry's Restaurant and Cafe 318 Tuam St.
 

The Friends of The Boniuk Library invite you to join our Breakfast Book Club for a discussion of "Defiance" by Nechama Tec. The author, a Holocaust survivor, tells the story of the Bielski partisan group, the largest armed rescue operation of Jews by Jews in World War II. This event is free, but participants must pay for their own breakfast. For more information contact Maria Harris, Librarian, at (713) 942-8000, x.110 or library@hmh.org.

 


 
 
 
Lyndon Baines Johnson Moral Courage Award Dinner
May 24, 2018 7:00 PM - 9:00 PM
Location Hilton Americas - Houston, 1600 Lamar Street, Houston, TX
 

 
 
 

"When Our Dictator Turns Up": German and American Journalists Respond to the Fascist Threat


May 22, 2018 6:30 PM - 8:00 PM
Location Albert and Ethel Herzstein Theater
 

The success of Nazi fascism depended in large part upon the suppression of free speech, first and foremost, the absolute control of the press as a vehicle for propaganda. Dr. Millin's lecture will examine the process by which the Nazis assaulted, suppressed and replaced the free press. Many German journalists collaborated, some resisted. Foreign correspondents struggled to report what they saw without becoming unwilling mouthpieces for the regime. Dr. Millin's lecture will examine the process by which the Nazis gained control of the press and will tell as well the stories of German and American journalists who dared to criticize the Führer and his party. Historians reflect upon the past in order to illumine the present and to make wise decisions about our future. The history of journalists under the Third Reich is of profound importance for us today at a time when journalists and the freedom of the press are once again under threat from nationalist movements and authoritarian leaders worldwide.

Currently, Dr. Millin is a historian working in the USHMM's Levine Institute for Holocaust Education, Millin previously was the historian in the USHMM's photo archives, specializing in the photographs of German Jewry, the Aliyah Bet and the European Roma, as well as in the work of the Wehrmacht Propaganda Company photographers. She received her bachelor's degree from Macalester College, a master's in religious studies from Vanderbilt University and a doctorate in Jewish history at the Hebrew College-JIR. She was formerly a research fellow at the University of Göttingen and an Inter-University Fellow at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, she has taught Jewish history, Judaic studies, world religions and Holocaust studies at the Hebrew Union College-JIR, the University of Cincinnati and the University of Kentucky-Lexington. Millin's lecture is underwritten by the Warren Fellowship for Future Teachers, an annual program that works with students from across the country as they prepare to enter the teaching profession.


 
 
 
Warren Fellowship for Future Teachers Public Lecture with Nancy Patz: "The Elephant with a Knot in His Trunk"

May 21, 2018 6:30 PM - 8:00 PM
Location Herzstein Theater 9220 Kirby Dr., Suite 100
 

Nancy Patz is an award-winning author and illustrator of children's books, which often address emotionally sensitive topics. In "The Elephant with a Knot in His Trunk," Patz and orthodontist Stuart Sheer tell the story of an elephant born with a disability that keeps him from using his trunk as other elephants do. A graduate of Stanford University, Patz's paintings, prints and drawings have been exhibited in museums and galleries, and she often lectures to school and teachers' groups on her books and the art of the picture book.

Nancy Patz's lecture is underwritten by the Warren Fellowship for Future Teachers, an annual program that works with students from across the country as they prepare to enter the teaching profession.




 
 
 
Receivers of Information: Building Empathy through Storytelling and Art
May 17, 2018 6:30 PM - 8:00 PM
Location Albert and Ethel Herzstein Theater 9220 Kirby Dr., Suite 100
 
Join us for the final lecture of the Spring 2018 Public Lecture Series, Intergenerational Trauma & Memory: History Carried Through Generations with Diane Benavides Rios, as she discusses her work through the lenses of a Chicana, educator, and artist. This session will take participants on a reflective journey and open dialogue that will focus on the process of art making and collecting stories as a form of transformation. The community is invited to experience how they are distinctly positioned to design change for the spaces they occupy.

This event is free and open to the public. Seating is limited, and advance registration is requested. To RSVP online, visit http://www.hmh.org/RegisterEvent.aspx.

 
 
 
Free Admission Day in honor of Stefi Altman
May 15, 2018 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Location Holocaust Museum Houston
 

Museum admission will be waived on Tuesday, May 15, 2018 in honor of Holocaust survivor Stefi Altman, z"l.

Stefi Altman was just 13 years old when Germany overran Poland in September 1939. Soon after, Stefi's two older brothers were arrested and sent to a labor camp, and Nazi soldiers brutuall beat her fater and drove the family from their house. They fled to Stefi's grandfather's farm, taking shelter in the barn.

The family remained together until 1940, when Stefi was sent to the labor camp of Jastkov. Later she was sent to Treblinka and Majdanek. Next, she was sent to the camp of Dorohucza. Although Dorohucza had neither gas chambers nor crematoria of the other camps, death always hovered nearby. Like Stefi, many of the inmates were only half alive by the time they got there. At the end of 1943, Stefi discovered that her sister, Kayla, had also been sent to Dorohucza. But relief soon turned to horror when Kayla was brutally murdered. 

Stefi managed, against all odds, to escape Dorohucza. For the remainder of the war, she hid in a coffin-like space underneath a barn that belonged to a sympathetic Polish farmer. After she was liberated by the Soviets, she learned that her entire family had been murdered.

Stefi Altman, z"l, passed away in December 2017.

Supported by the Stefi Altman Endowment Fund.


 
 
 
Free Admission Day in honor of Walter Kase
May 5, 2018 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Location Holocaust Museum Houston
 

Museum admission fees will be waived on Saturday, May 5, 2018 in honor of Holocaust survivor Walter Kase, z"l.

When Germany invaded Poland in September 1949, it soon became clear that Walter's family's lives would never be the same again. At the end of 1940, Walter, his parents and his sister, Rysia, were herded into a Jewish ghetto. One day in 1941, the ghetto residents were told to gather in the city square. There, in front of her family, Rysia was lined up with other young children and shot to death. Twelve-year-old Walter was sent with his father to the labor camp of Pionki, later to Auschwitz and Sosnowiec, and finally to Mauthausen and two of its sub-camps.

Walter and his father were liberated by the 71st Infantry Division of the United States Army on May 5, 1945. Taken to a hospital to recuperate, Walter regained his strength, but his father succumbed a month later. Walter made his way back to Poland, where he was reunited with his mother. In 1947, Walter came to the United States, settling in Kansas City, Missouri. There, he finished his schooling, started a career in sales and was drafted and served proudly during the Korean War. Walter was able to bring his mother to the United States, where she settled in Washington, DC.

Walter moved to Houston, where he established a successful import business. He was active in Jewish causes, sitting on the boards of the Anti-Defamation League and Holocaust Museum Houston. The Anti-Defamation League established a Teachers' Award in Walter's name, and he was the first recipient of the St. Augustine Award from St. Thomas University in recognition of his life-changing impact on others.

Supported by the Walter Kase Endowment Fund.


 
 
 
Breakfast Book Club: "Music of the Ghosts" by Vaddey Ratner
May 3, 2018 9:00 AM - 10:00 AM
Location Harry's Restaurant and Cafe 318 Tuam St.
 

The Friends of The Boniuk Library invite you to join our Breakfast Book Club for a discussion of "Music of the Ghosts" by Vaddey Ratner. In this novel, a Cambodian child refugee, now an adult, returns to Phnom Penh to discover the truth about her family. This event is free, but participants must pay for their own breakfast. For more information contact Maria Harris, Librarian, at (713) 942-8000, x.110 or library@hmh.org.

 


 
 
 
Across the Waters (Denmark, 2016, 95 min, Drama, subtitles)
Director: Nicolo Donato

April 26, 2018 7:00 PM - 9:00 PM
Location Albert and Ethel Herzstein Theater 9220 Kirby Dr., Suite 100
 
Unsure of whom they can trust, a Jewish musician and his family make a frantic escape from Nazi-occupied Denmark. Enjoying the nightlife of 1943 Copenhagen, Jewish jazz guitarist Arne Itkin is initially skeptical when his terrified wife Miriam hears rumors of the round-up and deportation of Danish Jews. An overnight raid however, forces the couple to flee their home with their five-year-old son Jakob. Aided by a church pastor and underground resistance, they set out on a journey for the fishing village of Gilleleje, where refugees await passage to Sweden by boat. Amidst lurking danger from the Gestapo and their collaborators, the family puts its fate in the hands of strangers whose allegiance and motives are not always clear. Across the Waters is a gripping story of survival and rescue and based on true events. The film is directed and co-written by Nicolo Donato, whose own grandfather was among the courageous Danish fisherman to ferry war refugees to safety.

Sponsored by the Consulate General of Denmark




 
 
 
It's a Latino-Jewish Thing: Making Ancestral Connections through Genealogy
April 24, 2018 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM
Location Albert and Ethel Herzstein Theater 9220 Kirby Dr., Suite 100
 
Join HMH for the inaugural Latino-Jewish Genealogy Workshop featuring speaker Dr. Peter Tarlow, Chairman of the Texas Holocaust and Genocide Commission. As director at the Center for Latino-Jewish Relations and Crypto-Jewish Studies, he works to educate the Latino and Jewish communities about their shared history and lineage.

The lecture will be followed by Susan Kaufman of the Clayton Library Center for Genealogical Research with the Houston Public Library, who will be leading a session on how the public can access information and research these ancestral connections through the Clayton Library Services. This event is free and open to the public. Seating is limited, and advance registration is requested.

This program is in collaboration with Houston Public Library.



This program was made possible in part by Wells Fargo.




 
 
 
Unstable Ground: Climate Change, Conflict, and Genocide
April 19, 2018 6:30 PM - 8:00 PM
Location Albert and Ethel Herzstein Theater 9220 Kirby Dr., Suite 100
 
Join Holocaust Museum Houston for a lecture by Dr. Alex Alvarez, author of "Unstable Ground: Climate Change, Conflict, and Genocide," for the fourth lecture of the Spring 2018 Public Lecture Series, Intergenerational Trauma & Memory: History Carried Through Generations. Climate change is increasingly impacting communities and nations around the world and challenging our ability to cope and adapt to new environmental realities. It also poses significant risk for the onset of communal violence, war and genocide. This talk examines some of the risk factors for violent conflict brought by climate induced stress, especially around resources, population displacement and borders.

Dr. Alex Alvarez earned his Ph.D. in Sociology from the University of New Hampshire in 1991 and is a Professor in the Department of Criminology and Criminal Justice at Northern Arizona University. From 2001 until 2003 he was the founding Director of the Martin-Springer Institute for Teaching the Holocaust, Tolerance and Humanitarian Values. His main areas of study are in the areas of collective and interpersonal violence, including homicide and genocide.

This event is free and open to the public. Seating is limited, and advance registration is requested. To RSVP online, visit http://www.hmh.org/RegisterEvent.aspx.

 
 
 
Yom HaShoah Observance
April 15, 2018 3:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Location Congregation Emanu El 1500 Sunset Blvd.
 

Join Holocaust Museum Houston in observance of Yom HaShoah, a day of remembrance for the 6 million Jewish people who lost their lives during the Holocaust. During this annual commemoration, we will mourn the loss of all who perished, honor those who survived and come together as a community to remember and reflect.

Coordinated by the Yom HaShoah Steering Committee and Holocaust Museum Houston.

Funding for this service is generously provided by The Morgan Family Endowment Fund, the Morgan Family Center and the Morgan Family Foundation.

To live stream this event, please visit https://emanuelhouston.org/


 
 
 
Zikaron BaSalon - Memories in the Living Room
April 11, 2018 6:45 PM - 9:00 PM
Location 10 different locations in Houston
 

Zikaron BaSalon is an annual event, which takes place on Israeli Holocaust Memorial Day. Zikaron BaSalon started in Israel, in a living room where a few friends gathered in 2010 and experienced an extraordinary and meaningful event. 

Alongside formal events, Zikaron BaSalon offers a meaningful and intimate way to commemorate this day and address its implications through discussions at home among family, friends and guests. 

Zikaron BaSalon happens in the living room space of a home with 15-40 people. The event consists of three parts: testimony, expression and open discussion. Light refreshments will be served.

Please RSVP at www.houstonjewish.org/memories by April 8th. You will be notified closer to the event of your assigned location.


 
 
 
Breakfast Book Club: "Maus" by Art Spiegelman
April 5, 2018 9:00 AM - 10:00 AM
Location Harry's Restaurant and Cafe 318 Tuam St.
 
The Friends of The Boniuk Library invite you to join our Breakfast Book Club for a discussion of "Maus 1: My Father Bleeds History" by Art Spiegelman. This graphic novel tells us two concurrent stories: the first, Speigelman's experience trying to relate to his Holocaust survivor father, and the second, the father's own experience during the Holocaust. This event is free, but participant must pay for their own breakfast. For more information contact Maria Harris, Librarian, at (713) 942-8000, x.110 or library@hmh.org.

 
 
 
Eyes of a Dreamer: A Survivor's Experience
March 29, 2018 6:30 PM - 8:00 PM
Location Albert and Ethel Herzstein Theater
 
Join Holocaust Museum Houston for the third lecture of the Spring 2018 Public Lecture Series, Intergenerational Trauma & Memory: History Carried Through Generations, with Jessica Lorena Rangel, founder of the nonprofit Eyes of a Dreamer, as she shares her story of immigrating to the United States as a child with her mother. Rangel will discuss how the experience has shaped her into an activist in the Houston community and how her emerging voice is supporting immigrant communities throughout Texas and the United States.

This event is free and open to the public. Seating is limited, and advance registration is requested. To RSVP online, visit http://www.hmh.org/RegisterEvent.aspx.

 
 
 
Intimacy and Persecution: Intermarried Families in the Protectorate of Bohemia and Moravia during the Holocaust
March 18, 2018 6:30 PM - 8:00 PM
Location Albert and Ethel Herzstein Theater – 9220 Kirby Dr., Suite 100
 
In her talk, Tatjana Lichtenstein will explore the experiences of intermarried families, Jews and non-Jews, during the Holocaust in the Bohemian Lands (today’s Czech Republic). As in Germany and Austria, the number of people considered by the Nazi authorities to be in mixed marriages or people of mixed ancestry was substantial. These individuals inhabited a particular place in the Nazi radical order, one of relative privilege vis-a-vis Jewish families. Yet, their history is not well understood. Because of their initial exemptions from the harshest anti-Jewish legislation, including deportation, after the war, intermarried individuals themselves, other Jewish survivors as well as scholars downplayed the gravity and significance of these individuals’ experiences. In her talks, Lichtenstein will examine the fate of intermarried families and what this history can tell us about the Holocaust. 

Tatjana Lichtenstein is an Associate Professor in the Department of History and the Director of Schusterman Center for Jewish Studies at the University of Texas at Austin. She holds degrees from the University of Toronto (PhD), Brandeis University (MA), and the University of Copenhagen (BA/MA). before coming to UT in 2009, she was a Schusterman Postdoctoral Fellow in Jewish Studies at American University in Washington, D.C. Dr. Lichenstein’s Research focuses on minorities, nationalism, state-building, war and genocide in Eastern Europe in the twentieth century. Her monograph, Zionists in Interwar Czechoslovakia: Minority Nationalism and the Politics of Belonging, was published by Indiana University Press in 2016. Presently, Dr. Lichtenstein is working on a new book project entitled “Intimacy and Persecution: Jews, Non-Jews, and the Holocaust in the Bohemian Lands.” It explores the experiences of intermarried Jewish and non-Jewish families during the Second World War. At UT, Dr. Lichtenstein teaches classes on the Holocaust and the World Wars in Eastern Europe. In these courses, she introduces students to the broad ideological and political background for the wars, to ordinary people’s wartime experiences, as well as to the legacies of mass violence in European societies. She has been part of the Frank Denius Normandy Scholar Program on World War II since 2014.

This event is free and open to the public. Seating is limited, and advance registration is requested.

This lecture is sponsored by The Program in Jewish Studies at Rice University.


 
 
 
The Whispering Town
March 16, 2018 10:00 AM - 11:00 AM
Location HMH Classroom 9220 Kirby Dr., Suite 100
 

Holocaust Museum Houston's education department will host story time, featuring "The Whispering Town" by author Jennifer Elvgren and illustrator Fabio Santomauro, followed by an art activity. "The Whispering Town" tells the dramatic story of Anett and her parents who shelter a Jewish family in Nazi-occupied Denmark, waiting to be ferried to safety in neutral Sweden. The soldiers patrolling their street are growing suspicious, so the Jewish family must make their way to the harbor. Worried about their safety, Anett devises a clever and unusual plan for their safe passage to the harbor. "The Whispering Town" is based on a true story.

Story time is free and open to the public.

 
 
 
La Ciudad de Susurros
March 16, 2018 11:30 AM - 12:30 PM
Location HMH Classroom 9220 Kirby Dr., Suite 100
 

El departamento de educación del Museo Holocausto de Houston tendrá una hora de cuento con el libro "La Cuidad de Susurros" de la autora Jennifer Elvgren y el ilustrador Fabio Santomauro,  con una actividad de arte después. "La Cuidad de Susurros" cuenta la dramática historia de Anett y sus padres que están escondiendo a una familia judía en Dinamarca durante el tiempo de la ocupación nazi, esperando ser transportados a un lugar seguro en la neutral Suecia. Soldados que patrullan la calles están creciendo sospechoso, y la familia judía debe hacer su camino hacia el puerto pronto. Preocupada por su seguridad, Anett diseña un plan para un paso seguro al puerto. " La Cuidad de Susurros" se basa en una historia real.

Este cuento de libro es gratis para publico.

 
 
 
Oral Testimony Collection Debut
March 15, 2018 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM
Location HMH Classroom 9220 Kirby Dr., Suite 100
 

Join HMH for the debut of the USC Shoah Foundation’s newly digitized Holocaust Museum Houston survivor testimony database. Visitors can research historical information about subjects such as concentration camps, towns and life before the Holocaust as seen through the eyes of 277 Houston-area survivors, pulling the information from a database of the survivors’ video testimonies within seconds. 

This event is free with Museum admission.


 
 
 
Winter Hunt (Germany, 2017, 74 min, Drama)
Director: Astrid Schult

March 15, 2018 6:00 PM - 7:45 PM
Location Evelyn Rubenstein Jewish Community Center 5601 S. Braeswood Blvd.
 
On a cold, wintry night, Lena shows up on the doorstep of the Rossberg family mansion. She claims her car has broken down, but her arrival is intentional. Lena is in pursuit of Anselm Rossberg, an aged Auschwitz guard who lives with his daughter, Maria. Anselm and Maria both deny Anselm's past, but Lena is determined to get him to confess, even as her own weapon is turned on her and she is forced into a moral dilemma. 

Holocaust Museum Houston's Guild serves as Community Partner for this film screening.

The Houston Jewish Film Festival takes place from Sunday, March 3 - Sunday, March 18, 2018.

Click here to register on the Evelyn Rubenstein Jewish Community Center website.

 
 
 
Survivor Testimony: Dr. Anna Steinberger
March 14, 2018 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM
Location Albert and Ethel Herzstein Theater 9220 Kirby Dr., Suite 100
 

Join Holocaust Museum Houston as survivor Dr. Anna Steinberger gives her testimony. Germany attacked Poland in September 1939, when Anna was 11 years old. As bombs fell, Anna and her parents and older brother fled eastward together with thousands of other refugees. Eventually, Anna's family reached Rovno, in the Soviet zone of occupied Poland. One day a Red Army soldier knocked on their door and offered them a choice: return home to the German zone of Poland, or "resettle" in the Soviet Union. They chose the Soviet Union, and were sent to Kolchoz, near Stalingrad, where they toiled on a collective farm. When Germany invaded the USSR in June 1941, Anna's brother was drafted into the Soviet Army and the rest of the family was relocated again, this time to Alma Ata in the Kazakh Republic.

This event is free with Museum admission.


 
 
 
Survivor Testimony: Chaja Verveer
March 14, 2018 12:30 PM - 1:30 PM
Location Albert and Ethel Herzstein Theater 9220 Kirby Dr., Suite 100
 
Join Holocaust Museum Houston as survivor Chaja Verveer shares her testimony. Chaja was born in Maarsbergen, Holland in 1941, after Germany had occupied the country. When she was just one year old, Chaja and her family went into hiding, splitting up because they were too many to stay in one place. Chaja ended up in Leiden with the van den Bergs, a Dutch family active in the Resistance. 

In February 1944, the van den Bergs were betrayed and Chaja was sent to Westerbork, a transit camp in northeastern Holland. Trains departed regularly from Westerbork or the extermination camps in German-occupied Poland. On September 13, 1944, the last train left Westerbork. On it were 51 children, including Chaja. After three grueling days and nights on the train, the children arrived in Bergen Belson. The children were subsequently sent to Theresienstadt, a ghetto and transit camp in Czechoslovakia. Chaja was liberated in May 1945.

This event is free with Museum admission.

 
 
 
Oral Testimony Collection Debut
March 13, 2018 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM
Location HMH Classroom 9220 Kirby Dr., Suite 100
 

Join HMH for the debut of the USC Shoah Foundation’s newly digitized Holocaust Museum Houston survivor testimony database. Visitors can research historical information about subjects such as concentration camps, towns and life before the Holocaust as seen through the eyes of 277 Houston-area survivors, pulling the information from a database of the survivors’ video testimonies within seconds.

This event is free with Museum admission.

 
 
 
Let's Be Friends!
March 12, 2018 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM
Location HMH Classroom 9220 Kirby Dr., Suite 100
 

Grandparents, grandchildren, parents and children are invited to participate in a fun story time and writing workshop hosted by  the Friends of the Boniuk Library. "Let's Be Friends!" begins with a two picture book read-alouds about friendship, "How to Grow a Friend" by Sara Gillingham and "Peanut Butter and Jellyfish" by Jarrett J. Krosoczka. Children will then enjoy crafts, face-painting and writing workshops by Writers in the Schools (WITS).

WITS weaves together art and education in libraries, museums, parks, hospitals and community centers, bringing the joy of stories to children throughout Houston. 

Story time is free and open to the public. 

 
 
 
Riphagen: The Untouchable (Netherlands, 2016, 131 min, Drama)
Director: Pieter Kuijpers

March 11, 2018 2:00 PM - 4:00 PM
Location Evelyn Rubenstein Jewish Community Center 5601 S Braeswood Blvd.
 
A gripping, intense wartime thriller, "Riphage: The Untouchable" is the chilling epic of a real gangster and war profiteer who betrayed countless Jews in WWII Amsterdam. A foremost figure of the Dutch underworld, the menacing Dries Riphagen was a slick and unscrupulous con artist, most infamously remembered by history as a fervent Jew hunter. As a Nazi collaborator, Riphagen was tasked with tracking down Jews in hiding and confiscating their valuables. Using blackmail to extort small fortunes in jewels, property and currency, he would later betray the location of Jewish families and turn them over to the Germans to meet their fates. Only Jan van Liempd (Kay Greidanus), a young policeman secretly fighting alongside the Resistance, sees through the scheme. His determination to bring the sociopathic war criminal to justice develops into a deadly cat-and-mouse game, as he implacably and zealously pursues a years-long manhunt for the untouchable Riphagen.

Holocaust Museum Houston serves as Community Partner for this film screening.

The Houston Jewish Film Festival takes place from Sunday, March 3 - Sunday, March 18, 2018.

Click here to register on the Evelyn Rubenstein Jewish Community Center website.

 
 
 
Breakfast Book Club: "The Cellist of Sarajevo" by Steven Galloway
March 8, 2018 9:00 AM - 10:00 AM
Location Harry's Restaurant and Cafe 318 Tuam St.
 
The Friends of The Boniuk Library invite you to join our Breakfast Book Club for a discussion of "The Cellist of Sarajevo" by Steven Galloway. In this novel, a musician plays to commemorate a mortar attack as events unfold around him in a city under siege. This event is free, but participants must pay for their own breakfast. For more information contact Maria Harris, Librarian, at (713) 942-8000, x .110 or library@hmh.org.

 
 
 
The Children of Chance (France, 2016, 95 min, Drama, subtitles)
Director: Malik Chibane

March 6, 2018 8:00 PM - 9:45 PM
Location Albert and Ethel Herzstein Theater
 

As part of the Houston Jewish Film Festival, Holocaust Museum Houston will screen the film, "The Children of Chance". A broken leg is a lucky misfortune for Maurice Gutman, a young Jewish boy who is taken away by ambulance just as the Jews of Paris are being rounded up by the French police during WWII. Diagnosed with tuberculosis,Maurice is sheltered in a children's hospital ward. As the war intensifies, the chief physician and senior nurse resort to drastic measures to keep Maurice and the other Jewish patients safe. Based on a true story, this tender coming-of-age drama is a testament to the resilience and bravery of youth.

The Houston Jewish Film Festival takes place from Sunday, March 3 - Sunday, March 18, 2018.

Tickets are $8 for HMH members, JCC members, MFAH Film Buffs, seniors and students; $10 for public/ non-members.

 
 
 
The Children of Chance (France, 2016, 95 min, Drama, subtitles)
Director: Malik Chibane

March 6, 2018 6:00 PM - 7:45 PM
Location Albert and Ethel Herzstein Theater
 

As part of the Houston Jewish Film Festival, Holocaust Museum Houston will screen the film, "The Children of Chance". A broken leg is a lucky misfortune for Maurice Gutman, a young Jewish boy who is taken away by ambulance just as the Jews of Paris are being rounded up by the French police during WWII. Diagnosed with tuberculosis,Maurice is sheltered in a children's hospital ward. As the war intensifies, the chief physician and senior nurse resort to drastic measures to keep Maurice and the other Jewish patients safe. Based on a true story, this tender coming-of-age drama is a testament to the resilience and bravery of youth.

The Houston Jewish Film Festival takes place from Sunday, March 3 - Sunday, March 18, 2018.

Tickets are $8 for HMH members, JCC members, MFAH Film Buffs, seniors and students; $10 for public/ non-members.

 
 
 
Healing Generational Trauma with Generational Gifts
February 15, 2018 6:30 PM - 8:00 PM
Location Albert and Ethel Herzstein Theater 9220 Kirby Dr., Suite 100
 
Join Holocaust Museum Houston for a lecture by Tonita Gonzalez, where she'll explain and share her beautiful shawl of diversity, representing different cultures and the various traditional medicine practices used for healing. Gonzalez says, "Within each individual we have beautiful gifts of our ancestors. Every human being has the ability to heal, and each of our ancestors have brought these gifts through their medicine. This healing medicine is found in cultural and indigenous science, spirituality and storytelling. Each of us brings to the table a variety of traditional wisdom and knowledge."

The second lecture of the Spring 2018 Public Lecture Series, Intergenerational Trauma & Memory: History Carried Through Generations, guest will learn more about healing communities and individuals from generational traumas through ancestral gifts.

This event is free and open to the public. Seating is limited, and advance registration is requested. To RSVP online, visit http://www.hmh.org/RegisterEvent.aspx.

 
 
 
Breakfast Book Club: "Mischling" by Affinity Konar
February 8, 2018 9:00 AM - 10:00 AM
Location Harry's Restaurant and Cafe 318 Tuam St.
 
The Friends of the Boniuk Library invite you to join our Breakfast Book Club for a discussion of "Mischling" by Affinity Konar. This novel tells the story of two sisters in Mengele's Zoo, an experimental population of twins at Auschwitz. This event is free, but participants must pay for their own breakfast. For more information contact Maria Harris, Librarian, at (713) 942-8000, x.110 or library@hmh.org.

This event is open to the public. Seating is limited, and advance registration is requested. To RSVP online, visit www.hmh.org/RegisterEvent.aspx.

Buy Book


 
 
 
Ten Dollars to Hate
February 6, 2018 6:30 PM - 8:00 PM
Location Herzstein Theater 9220 Kirby Dr., Suite 100
 
Join Holocaust Museum Houston for a lecture by Patricia Bernstein, author of "Ten Dollars to Hate," the story of the massive Ku Klux Klan of the 1920s and the first prosecutor in the nation to successfully convict and jail Klan members. Dan Moody, a twenty-nine-year-old Texas District attorney, demonstrated that Klansmen could be punished for taking the law into their own hands. The 1920s Klan infiltrated politics and law enforcement across the United States. Klansmen engaged in extreme violence against white people as well as black people, promoted outrageous bigotry against various ethnic groups, and boycotted non-Klan businesses. A few courageous public officials tried to make Klansmen pay for their crimes and all failed until September 1923 when Dan Moody convicted and won significant prison time for five Klans men in a tense courtroom in Georgetown, Texas.



Photo Credit: United States Holocaust Memorial Museum

 
 
 
Intergenerational Trauma & Memory: History Carried Through Generations Lecture Series - Public Lecture with Dr. Christopher Carmona


January 25, 2018 6:30 PM - 8:00 PM
Location Albert and Ethel Herzstein Theater
 
Join HMH for an evening with Dr. Christopher Carmona in the first lecture of the Spring 2018 Lecture Series, Intergenerational Trauma & Memory: History Carried Through Generations, in correlation with the South Texas Human Rights Art Exhibition and Holocaust Museum Houston's Latino Initiatives Advisory Committee (LIAC).

Dr. Carmona is an Assistant Professor of Creative Writing and the coordinator of Mexican American Studies for the Brownsville Campus of the University of Texas Rio Grande Valley. He is a member of the Ad Hoc Committee for the TX State Board of Education for Mexican American Studies. Currently, he serves as the Chair of the National Association for Chicana and Chicano Studies (NACCS) Tejas Foco Committee on Implementing Mexican American Studies (MAS) in PreK-12 Education in Texas.

Dr. Carmona will discuss writing about trauma passed down through oral stories and how he was able to create a superhero story that not only challenges the narrative of 'American Exceptionalism,' but also questions how we think about memory and reality. Currently, he is working on a series of YA novellas reimagining the "Lone Ranger" story as a Chicanx superhero fighting Texas Rangers in the Rio Grande Valley from 1905-1920. In the writing of "El Rinche: The Ghost Ranger of Rio Grande," Carmona "flips the script" on the Lone Ranger story by creating a Chicano superhero that disguises himself as a Texas Ranger (rinche) and fights the injustices of the rinches. Rinche is a Spanish slang word used to describe a Texas Ranger.

Dr. Carmona's new bilingual book of poetry entitled "140: Twitter Poems" was published by Jade Press in 2017. Book One of "El Rinche: The Ghost Ranger of the Rio Grande" will be published in late 2018.

This event is free and open to the public. Seating is limited, and advance registration is requested. To RSVP online, visit www.hmh.org/RegisterEvent.aspx.

 
 
 
UN Experience
January 23, 2018 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM
Location One UN Plaza, New York, NY 10017
 
Join us for a private United Nations experience The Butterfly Project: Remembering children of the Holocaust
 
 
 
Breakfast Book Club: "My Beautiful Birds" by Suzanne Del Rizzo
January 11, 2018 9:00 AM - 10:00 AM
Location Harry's Restaurant and Cafe 318 Tuam St.
 
The Friends of the Boniuk Library invite you to join our Breakfast Book Club for a discussion of "My Beautiful Birds" by Suzanne Del Rizzo. This children's book tells the story of Sami who, living in a refugee camp, can't forget his pet pigeons and the home his family has left behind. One day a canary, a dove, and a rose finch fly into his camp. They flutter around Sami and settle on his outstretched arms. For Sami it is one step in a long healing process at last. This event is free, but participants must pay for their own breakfast. For more information contact Maria Harris, Librarian, at (713) 942-8000, x.110 or library@hmh.org.

Buy Book

 
 
 
Spector/Warren Fellowship for Future Teachers Public Lecture with Professor Peter Hayes : "Why?: Explaining the Holocaust"
January 10, 2018 6:30 PM - 8:00 PM
Location HMH's Herzstein Theater 9220 Kirby Dr., Suite 100
 
Peter Hayes, the content expert working with Holocaust Museum Houston on our expanding Museum’s Permanent Exhibition, earned his Ph.D. at Yale. He specializes in the history of Germany in the 20th century, particularly the Nazi period. He will explore the fundamental conceptual questions asked and responded to in his most recent book, "Why?: Explaining the Holocaust. " The author of 12 books,  Hayes taught at Northwestern University for 36 years from 1980 to 2016. The recipient of numerous teaching awards and research fellowships and a former member of the academic boards of several professional societies and Holocaust memorial sites, Professor Hayes currently serves as the chair of the Academic Committee of the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. Seating is limited, and advance registration is requested. To RSVP online, visit www.hmh.org/RegisterEvent.aspx.

Photo Credit: United States Holocaust Memorial Museum

 
 
 
2017 Events

 



December 7, 2017 9:00 AM - 10:00 AM
Location Harry’s Restaurant and Café 318 Tuam St
 
The Friends of The Boniuk Library invite you to join our Breakfast Book Club for a discussion of "Displaced Persons" by Joseph Berger. Berger's memoir describes a family of Polish Jews growing up in post-World War II America. This event is free, but participants must pay for their own breakfast. For more information, contact Maria Harris, Librarian, at (713) 942-8000, x110 or library@hmh.org.

BUY BOOK

 
 
 

After Auschwitz (USA, 2017, 83 minutes)
Jon Kean, Director




November 14, 2017 6:30 PM - 8:00 PM
Location Albert and Ethel Herzstein Theater
 

Join Holocaust Museum Houston for a viewing of "After Auschwitz," the latest film by documentarian Jon Kean. It's an emotional sequel to his acclaimed film Swimming in Auschwitz, where he followed the lives of six women as they faced the fall of Europe and the horrors of the Nazi Third Reich in Auschwitz-Birkenau. After Auschwitz follows the lives of the same six women as they transition from the fear of imminent death the day before liberation in 1945 through their post-war returns to hometowns in Europe to continued survival in present day Los Angeles. Their stories of the changing face of American society in the second half of the 20th century are much more resonant as they are told through the lens of people who have survived the worst atrocity in modern history. The film screening will be followed by a Q&A with director Jon Kean.



 
 
 
After Auschwitz (USA, 2017, 83 minutes)
Jon Kean, Director

November 14, 2017 6:30 PM - 8:00 PM
Location Albert and Ethel Herzstein
 
Join Holocaust Museum Houston for a viewing of "After Auschwitz," the latest film by documentarian Jon Kean. It's an emotional sequel to his acclaimed film Swimming in Auschwitz, where he followed the lives of six women as they faced the fall of Europe and the horrors of the Nazi Third Reich in Auschwitz-Birkenau. After Auschwitz follows the lives of the same six women as they transition from the fear of imminent death the day before liberation in 1945 through their post-war returns to hometowns in Europe to continued survival in present day Los Angeles. Their stories of the changing face of American society in the second half of the 20th century are much more resonant as they are told through the lens of people who have survived the worst atrocity in modern history. The film screening will be followed by a Q&A with director Jon Kean.
 
 
 
Breakfast Book Club: "Sarah's Key" by Tatiana de Rosnay
November 9, 2017 9:00 AM - 10:00 AM
Location Harry's Restaurant and Café 318 Tuam St
 
The Friends of The Boniuk Library invite you to join our Breakfast Book Club for a discussion of "Sarah's Key" by Tatiana de Rosnay. The novel tells the story of a journalist who uncovers the story of a child that was arrested during the occupation of Paris. This event is free, but participants must pay for their own breakfast. For more information contact Maria Harris, Librarian, at (713) 942-8000, x .110 or library@hmh.org.

BUY BOOK

 
 
 
"The Youth Diarists of 'Salvaged Pages'": A Workshop with Editor Alexandra Zapruder
November 5, 2017 11:30 AM - 4:00 PM
Location Albert and Ethel Herzstein Theater
 
In this workshop, Alexandra Zapruder, editor of National Jewish Book Award-winning "Salvaged Pages: Young Writers' Diaries of the Holocaust," will speak to educators, docents, writers, researchers and all who attend about her stirring collection of diaries by young people during the Holocaust. The diaries reflect a vast and diverse range of experiences - some of the writers were refugees, others were hiding or passing as non-Jews, some were imprisoned in ghettos. In its first edition, "Salvaged Pages" offered the first comprehensive collection of such writings, with extensive excerpts from 15 diaries, 10 of which had never before been translated and published in English. The diarists ranged in age from 12 to 22; some survived the Holocaust but most perished. Taken together, their accounts of daily events and their often unexpected thoughts, ideas and feelings serve to deepen and complicate understanding of life during the Holocaust. Zapruder was the exhibition researcher and educator for the permanent and traveling versions of "Remember the Children, Daniel's Story" at the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum. She is currently an independent writer and scholar.

The workshop highlights Zapruder's insights and her years of experience talking about these young writers, which she does with compassion, intelligence and candor. Alexandra will sign purchased copies of her book, which will be available in the Museum store. Tickets are $30.00. Visit www.hmh.org/registerevent.aspx to register online. For further inquiries, please call (713) 527-1623.

 
 
 
Guardian of the Human Spirit Luncheon 2017
November 2, 2017 12:00 PM - 1:30 PM
Location Hilton Americas Houston
 
Join us for this annual luncheon honoring dedicated Houstonians who have worked to enhance the lives of others.
 
 
 
Luther, Bonhoeffer, and the Legacy of Antisemitism in Germany and the Third Reich with Claire Hein Blanton
Cosponsored by University of St. Thomas

October 24, 2017 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM
Location Jones Hall University of St. Thomas 3800 Montrose Blvd.
 
The dual questions of "how and why" continue to haunt those who study the Third Reich, the Holocaust, and the complicity of ordinary people. They point to a variety of root causes: a weakened German economy, changing social demographics and patterns in Central Europe, and the "humiliation" of the German people post World War I, among others. However, the historic antisemitism in Europe, particularly among Christians, is often assumed to be an important catalyst for the bombastic success of Hitler and Nazi ideology.

That there certainly existed a range from explicit to latent antisemitism amongst Christians in Germany is historic fact. The Protestant Reformation's Martin Luther figures prominently in this anti-Semitism, with explicitly anti-Semitic remarks throughout his writings. That Luther's legacy in Germany is most significant within both the history and the folklore of Germany leads some scholars to directly indict Luther as the theologian responsible for the rise of the Third Reich and the Holocaust.

Yet, there exists within this period devout Lutherans, opposing Nazi ideologies and its policies. Among these, Dietrich Bonhoeffer is, perhaps, the most well regarded for his public writings on questions of Jewish/Christian relations and the importance of caring for one's neighbor.

Claire Hein Blanton holds a BA in History from Rice University and a Master's of Divinity in Biblical and Theological Studies from Baylor University's Truett Seminary.

Parking at University of St. Thomas:
Guests may park at the Moran Parking Center, at the corner of West Alabama and Graustark streets. The fee for parking is $5, and pay machines are located at each exit.

This program was made possible in part with a grant from Humanities Texas, the state affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities.



 
 
 
Human Rights Art Exhibition Opening

October 19, 2017 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM
Location Mincberg Gallery
 
The "Human Rights Art" exhibition cultivates human rights awareness, reflection and activism, showcased in 32 mixed media artworks from permanent collection of South Texas College. This educational exhibition addressing global and regional human rights, social injustice and environmental issues features artist Sharon Sayegh, Keith Sharp, Guadalupe Victoria Reyes and Deborah South McEvoy. Through their artwork and personal statements, the artists strive to encourage reflection, and generate discussion that ultimately leads to change.

You are invited to an opening reception held 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Thursday, October 19, 2017, in the Museum's Mincberg Gallery at the Morgan Family Center, just one mile south of NRG Stadium at 9220 Kirby Dr., Suite 100. Jenny Bryson Clark, Associate Professor of Political Science and chair of Women's Studies at South Texas College, will give opening remarks at 6:30 p.m. Admission is free, but advance registration is required for this reception. Visit http://www.hmh.org/RegisterEvent.aspx to register online.



 
 
 

October 19, 2017 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM
Location Mincberg Gallery
 

 
 
 
Breakfast Book Club: “Anna and the Swallow Man” by Gavriel Savit
October 3, 2017 9:00 AM - 10:00 AM
Location Harry’s Restaurant and Café 318 Tuam St Houston, TX 77006
 
The Friends of The Boniuk Library invite you to join our Breakfast Book Club for a discussion of “Anna and the Swallow Man” by Gavriel Savit. The book tells the story of seven-year-old Anna who, when her university professor father is sent by the Gestapo to a concentration camp, travels the Polish countryside with the mysterious Swallow Man during World War II. This event is free, but participants must pay for their own breakfast. For more information contact Maria Harris, Librarian, at (713) 942-8000, x.110 or library@hmh.org.

BUY BOOK 

 Buy Books
 
 
 
Breakfast Book Club: “The Zookeeper’s Wife” by Diane Ackerman
August 3, 2017 9:00 AM - 10:00 AM
Location Harry’s Restaurant and Café 318 Tuam St Houston, TX 77006
 
The Friends of The Boniuk Library invite you to join our Breakfast Book Club for a discussion of “The Zookeeper’s Wife” by Diane Ackerman. The book tells the true story of zookeepers Jan and Antonina Zabinski, who saved over 300 people from the Nazis by hiding them within the zoo. This event is free, but participants must pay for their own breakfast. For more information contact Maria Harris, Librarian, at (713) 942-8000, x.110 or library@hmh.org.



 Buy Books
 
 
 
HMH Celebration of Hope
July 22, 2017 10:00 AM - 2:00 PM
Location Morgan Family Center
 
Join HMH for a “Celebration of Hope” Saturday, July 22 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. The family-friendly affair is part of the free admission weekend before the museum closes July 24 and relocates during its recently announced $33.8 million expansion. Activities include live music, food trucks, poetry readings by Writers Resist: Houston, kids’ butterfly art activities and face painting, interactive murals centered around hope, and live demonstrations by art students from Harmony Schools and Via Colori chalk artists Team RussKell.  Special booths by HMH partners Barnes & Noble, Houston Japanese American Citizens League, Equality Texas, American Civil Liberties Union, Center for the Healing of Racism, and Asia Society will provide information and fun activities for all ages.  Guided docent tours are scheduled for 11:30 a.m., 12:30 p.m.,1:30 p.m., 2:30 p.m. and 3:30 p.m., along with special appearances and conversations with Houston-area Holocaust survivors at 11 a.m. and 1 p.m.

Admission to the museum is waived both Saturday and Sunday, July 22 and 23, allowing visitors one last viewing of HMH’s “Bearing Witness” permanent exhibition, along with the WWII German railcar, Danish rescue boat, memorial room and galleries.  Featured exhibitions include a poetry display by Houston-area students on understanding the Holocaust, and “Vedem:  The Underground Magazine of the Terezin Ghetto” on view in the Mincberg Gallery.  “Vedem,” a multi-media art exhibition created by Rina Taraseiskey, Michael Murphy and Danny King, deconstructs and reinterprets the literary work of a secret society of Jewish boys who created the longest running magazine in any Nazi camp. 

Last month, HMH announced a dramatic expansion to more than double its size to a total of 57,000 square feet and make HMH the fourth-largest Holocaust museum in the country. Construction will require HMH to temporarily relocate most of its permanent exhibit, classrooms and administrative offices to 9220 Kirby Drive, Suite 100. The Museum will close on Monday, July 24 to begin the move and open to visitors at its temporary location on Tuesday, Sept. 5. 


 
 
 
Max M. Kaplan Summer Institute Public Lecture, Author Appearance & Book Signing with Dr. John Cox
Racism, Fascism and Genocide:  Past and Present

July 13, 2017 6:30 PM - 8:00 PM
Location Albert and Ethel Herzstein Theater
 
Dr. John Cox is Associate Professor of International Studies at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte where he directs the Center for Holocaust, Genocide & Human Rights (HGHR) Studies.

His first book, “Circles of Resistance: Jewish, Leftist, and Youth Dissidence in Nazi Germany” was published in 2009, and his most current book, “To Kill a People: Genocide in the Twentieth Century” was published in February 2016 by Oxford University Press. John earned his Ph.D. in History at UNC-Chapel Hill in 2006.  He came to UNC Charlotte in 2011, after teaching History for five years at Florida Gulf Coast University, where he founded and directed a Holocaust & human rights studies center.

His current research projects analyze anti-Nazi resistance within Buchenwald and the post-war memory and political uses of that resistance; Jewish participation in the fight against Franco in Spain; and an analysis of the relationship of capitalism to genocide. John is also publishing a memoir written by a German-Jewish anti-Nazi resister, and co-editing a major volume on world genocide, to be published in 2018.

Admission is free and open to the public, but advance registration is required. Visit http://www.hmh.org/RegisterEvent.aspx to RSVP online.

 
Dr. John Cox

 
 
 
Max M. Kaplan Summer Institute’s Gerald Kaplan Endowed Lecture
with Mark Weitzman
Antisemitism:  Then and Now 

July 12, 2017 6:30 PM - 8:00 PM
Location Albert and Ethel Herzstein Theater
 
Mark Weitzman is director of government affairs and the director of the Task Force Against Hate and Terrorism for the Simon Wiesenthal Center. He is also the chief representative of the center to the United Nations in New York. 

Weitzman is a member of the official U.S. delegation to the International Holocaust Remembrance Alliance (formerly the Task Force for International Cooperation on Holocaust Education, Remembrance and Research), where he chairs the Committee on Antisemitism and Holocaust Denial. He is a member of the advisory panel of Experts on Freedom of Religion or Belief of the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE) and co-chairs the Working Group on International Affairs of the Global Forum on Antisemitism. 

Weitzman is also a participant in the program on Religion and Foreign Policy of the Council on Foreign Relations. He is also a board member and former vice president of the Association of Holocaust Organizations and was member of the advisory board of the Institute for the Study of Global Antisemitism and Policy at Yale University, as well as a longtime member of the official Jewish-Catholic Dialogue Group of New York.

Weitzman has authored many publications and books and is a winner of the 2007 National Jewish Book Award for best anthology for antisemitism. 

Admission is free and open to the public, but advance registration is required. Visit http://www.hmh.org/RegisterEvent.aspx to RSVP online.

 
 
 
Breakfast Book Club: 'My Mother's Secret" by J.L. Witterick
July 6, 2017 9:00 AM - 10:00 AM
Location Harry's Restaurant and Café 318 Tuam St Houston, TX 77006
 
The Friends of The Boniuk Library invite you to join our Breakfast Book Club for a discussion of “My Mother’s Secret” by J. L. Witterick. The novel tells the story of a mother and daughter who risk their lives to hide two Jewish families and a defecting German soldier in their home. This event is free, but participants must pay for their own breakfast. For more information contact Maria Harris, Librarian, at (713) 942-8000, x.110 or library@hmh.org. 
 Buy Books
 
 
 
The Boniuk Library Book Club Discussion of “Prudence” by David Treuer 
June 27, 2017 6:30 PM - 8:00 PM
Location HMH Conference Room
 
Join The Boniuk Library Book Club as Holocaust Museum Houston librarian Maria Harris facilitates a discussion of “Prudence” by David Treuer. This novel tells the story of an American bombardier. When his farewell departure for World War II is shattered by an act of violence involving an escaped German soldier, bombardier Frankie Washburn witnesses the unfolding of consequences that reverberate for several years. This event is free and open to the public. Visit http://www.hmh.org/RegisterEvent.aspx to RSVP online.  Registration is limited to 12 participants, but the discussion may be offered on a second date. If registration is full, contact Maria Harris at (713) 942-8000, x110 or library@hmh.org to add your name to an interest list.  You can buy the book at http://www.amazon.com/Prudence-Novel-David-Treuer/dp/1594634076/. 

 Press Release
 
 
 

Vedem: the Underground Magazine of the Terezin Ghetto


June 15, 2017 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM
Location Mincberg Gallery
 

Vedem, a multimedia art exhibition, deconstructs and reinterprets the literary work of a secret society of Jewish boys, who created the longest running magazine in any Nazi camp. Created by Rina Taraseiskey, Michael Murphy and Danny King.

This multimedia art exhibition deconstructs and reinterprets the literary work of a secret society of Jewish boys, who created the longest-running underground magazine in any Nazi camp. Using a combination of pop-art graphics, drawings, paintings, and the prose and poetry of adolescent prisoners in the Terezin Ghetto, the exhibit explores 83 weekly issues of the Vedem magazine. Produced from 1942 – 1944, the original ‘zine’ (hand-made magazine), is recreated through panels dedicated to various subject matter, such as “Features”, “Humor” and “News and Editorial” sections.

Vedem Underground enlarges the intimate scale of the original publication, while mixing and matching works of art with poetry and prose, to reinterpret a work of artistic resistance that remains as relevant today as it did more than 70 years ago. On display will be reproductions of 56 compelling objects, ephemera, photographs and 800 pages from the original Vedem magazines provided by Pamatnik Terezin, the Terezin Memorial Museum at the Terezin ghetto.  Also included are four videos of never before seen footage from Terezin filmed for the documentary film, “Vedem Underground.”

On view to the general public in HMH’s Mincberg Gallery beginning June 16, 2017, Vedem Underground is a testament to the human spirit. It pays tribute to the legacy of Vedem’s adolescent writers, editors and illustrators, who expressed themselves by creating their own medium - and knowingly risking their lives by doing so. Organized by The Vedem Underground Project and curated by Rina Taraseiskey, Michael Murphy and Danny King, the exhibition is the winner of the 2016 WORD Grant: The Bruce Geller Memorial Prize, a project of American Jewish University’s Institute for Jewish Creativity. Support for the exhibition was provided by the Righteous Persons Foundation, the Ziering Family Foundation and the Jewish Community Foundation of Los Angeles. To date, the exhibition has been on display at the Museum of Tolerance, LA; the LA Jewish Community Foundation & the Box Gallery; the El Paso Holocaust Museum.

HMH members are invited to a reception from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Thursday, June 15, 2017.  Admission is free, but advance registration is required for this reception. Visit http://www.hmh.org/RegisterEvent.aspx to RSVP online. 


 
 
 
“Survival in Shanghai” film screening
June 6, 2017 6:30 PM - 8:00 PM
Location Albert and Ethel Herzstein Theater
 
This documentary film covers the dark history during World War II when more than six million Jews were brutally massacred by the Nazis. Against this backdrop, Shanghai had received more than 25,000 Jewish refugees from Europe. In order to commemorate this segment of history, Shanghai Media Group had then made the film “Survival in Shanghai.” It is the largest action that was taken by Chinese television media to find the Jewish refugees and their descendants who survived Shanghai Ghetto. The entire production process lasted eight months, with film clippings from Germany, Austria, Untied States, and Israel, where about 40 survivors were interviewed. Welcome remarks by Dr. Kelly Zúñiga, Nancy Li-Tarim, Hon. Ambassador Li Qiangmin, Consul General of Chinese Consulate General in Houston.   This is a members only event and advance registration is requested. To RSVP online, visit www.hmh.org/RegisterEvent.aspx. 

Sponsored by the Consulate of the People's Republic of China.

 
 
 
The Butterfly Project Action Rally: Help Hope Rise Up
May 24, 2017 6:30 PM - 9:00 PM
Location The Black Sheep Agency 611 W 22nd Street
 
Hope isn’t wishful thinking—it’s taking action for a better future. In a world where strife, uncertainty and hate grab headlines and inspire fear in the hearts of people across the world, hope is a balm that heals. It’s powerful. It’s critical. Hope is a radical act.

Small actions, done by caring individuals, can change the world. But where does one start? How can you get involved to make a bigger impact? Join us for The Butterfly Project Action Rally on May 24th and find out how you can be a part of this global movement promoting a more compassionate, respectful and just society.

This event is about sharing stories, bridging barriers and finding ways to be useful in a rapidly changing world—helping to spread this movement of hope spread to every dark corner hate hides in.

Through The Butterfly Project, we will give you the tools to share your own stories of hope and help you rally for change in your community.
We believe that individual action can change people’s hearts and, with that, the future.

So, whether you're interested in sharing on social media or pounding the pavement for a worthy cause, we'll have stations set up to provide you with opportunities to influence impact in your own unique way. For example, you can take the #StandWithHope pledge and share your commitment in front of our butterfly mural or you can help write partners or sign-up to volunteer in the future. You can join our sticky note brainstorming session, to contribute your thoughts for how The Butterfly Project can influence change in the future. 

Or, you can simply show up and talk with others in the room. Conversation is the crux of bridging our communities for a better tomorrow, and we hope to start one on May 24th.

This event is free, but advance registration is requested. Visit https://www.eventbrite.com/e/the-butterfly-project-action-rally-help-hope-rise-up-tickets-34073056429 to RSVP online.

 
 
 
Lyndon Baines Johnson Moral Courage Award Dinner
May 23, 2017 7:00 PM - 10:00 PM
Location Marriott Marquis Houston, 1777 Walker Street
 

 
 
 
The Boniuk Library Book Club Discussion of “The Monuments Men” by Robert M. Edsel
May 16, 2017 6:30 PM - 8:00 PM
Location HMH Conference Room
 
Join The Boniuk Library Book Club as Holocaust Museum Houston librarian Maria Harris facilitates a discussion of “The Monuments Men” by Robert M. Edsel. This book tells the previously untold story of a little-known WWII Allied division whose mission was to track down European art and treasures that had been looted by the Nazis at Hitler's command. This event is free and open to the public. Visit http://www.hmh.org/RegisterEvent.aspx to RSVP online.  Registration is limited to 12 participants, but the discussion may be offered on a second date. If registration is full, contact Maria Harris at (713) 942-8000, x110 or library@hmh.org to add your name to an interest list.  You can buy the book at http://www.amazon.com/Monuments-Men-Thieves-Greatest-Treasure/dp/1599951509/. 

 
 
 
Houston Bracero Oral History Film & Texas Bracero Preservation
May 11, 2017 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM
Location Albert & Ethel Herzstein Theater
 

In conjunction with viewing “Bittersweet Harvest:  The Bracero Program 1942-1964,” see a screening of Texas Southern University Assistant Professor Dr. Jesus Esparza’s Houston Bracero Oral History Project, featuring the stories of seven Houston-area braceros and their families. Post film discussion with Dr. Esparza along with Sehila Mota Casper, Field Officer, National Trust for Historic Preservation, who is working to preserve the Rio Vista Farm in Socorro, Texas, one of the last known bracero processing centers in the United States.

Free and open to the public, but advance registration required at http://www.hmh.org/RegisterEvent.aspx.

 
 
 
“Persona Non Grata” Film Screening 
Directed by Cellin Gluck

May 10, 2017 6:30 PM - 9:00 PM
Location Albert & Ethel Herzstein Theater
 
“Persona Non Grata,” Japan, 2016, 139 minutes is the true story of the Japanese diplomat who acted against orders to save thousands of Jewish lives from Nazi extermination. Tracking events from 1934 to 1955, the film follows Chiune Sugihara from his early days in Manchuria to his posting as Japan’s consul in Lithuania during WWII. Caught amid the rigid policies of Japan, now bound by treaty with Nazi Germany, and his moral awakening, Sugihara put career and family at great risk by issuing transit visas to imperiled European refugees, to help more than 6,000 Jews escape to Japanese territory. Sugihara is the only Japanese recognized as Righteous Among the Nations by the Israeli government and honored at Yad Vashem. Special appearance by Consul General Amano of Japan. Admission is free and open to the public, but registration is required at http://www.hmh.org/RegisterEvent.aspx. 

Sponsored by:

     

 
 
 
Meet Holocaust Survivor Dr. Anna Steinberger
May 9, 2017 6:00 PM - 7:00 PM
Location Barnes & Noble Vanderbilt Square 3003 W. Holcombe Blvd., 77025
 
Meet and greet Holocaust survivor Dr. Anna Steinberger and learn how she and her family fled Poland to avoid the Nazi regime. Dr. Steinberger will provide an inspiring tale of her experience living six years in Russia before the war ended, her family losing everything except each other, then starting over in America.   Barnes & Noble will host a “Recommended by HMH” book section.  Event is free and open to the public.

 
 
 
“Labor Trafficking Past & Present” Panel Discussion
May 8, 2017 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM
Location Albert & Ethel Herzstein Theater
 
Join Children At Risk and United Against Human Trafficking at Holocaust Museum Houston for a viewing of the Exhibit “Bittersweet Harvest: The Bracero Program 1942-1964” followed by a panel discussion on the history of Labor trafficking in the U.S. and efforts to end this crime. Admission is free and open to the public, but registration is required at http://www.hmh.org/RegisterEvent.aspx. 

Co-sponsored by:

    

 
 
 
“Stolen Education” Screening & Discussion with filmmaker Enrique Alemán, Jr., Ph.D.
May 3, 2017 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM
Location Albert & Ethel Herzstein Theater
 

In conjunction with “Bittersweet Harvest:  The Bracero Program 1942-1964,” see a screening of “Stolen Education,” the untold story of Mexican-American school children who challenged Discrimination in Texas Schools in the 1950s and changed the face of education in the Southwest. Post film discussion with filmmaker and University of Texas at San Antonio Professor & Chair of Educational Leadership & Policy Studies, Dr. Enrique Alemán, Jr.

Free and open to the public, but advance registration required at http://www.hmh.org/RegisterEvent.aspx.

 
 
 
GENEALOGY WORKSHOP: “Getting Started in Family Research”
April 30, 2017 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
Location Avrohm I. Wisenberg Multi-Purpose Learning Center at HMH
 
The Friends of The Boniuk Library are pleased to present a Genealogy Workshop: Getting Started in Family Research. This workshop features essential information for beginning to learn about your ancestry. The program begins with Susan Kaufman, Manager of the Clayton Library Center for Genealogical Research, as she provides an introduction to genealogy. Next, HMH librarian Maria Harris describes how to research family history in relation to the Holocaust. Next, hear the personal experiences of HMH docent Eyal Enav as he describes his journey in learning about his heritage. Finally, Bennett Greenspan, CEO of Family Tree DNA, discusses how to get started with genealogical DNA testing. Admission is $12. Registration is required at http://www.hmh.org/RegisterEvent.aspx.

  


 
 
 
“In Darfur” by Playwright Winter Miller 
Act 2 Discussion with HMH’s Emily Sample

April 27, 2017 8:00 PM - 9:00 PM
Location The Landing Theatre 1119 Providence St
 
Holocaust Museum Houston’s Assistant Director of Education, Emily Sample, will host a talkback after the Thursday, April 27, 8 p.m. showing of the Landing Theatre Company’s production of “IN DARFUR” by playwright Winter Miller. The play is set in an Internally Displaced Persons camp in Sudan in 2004, and depicts the interactions of an English teacher who may be pregnant through rape, a New York Times journalist, a doctor, and a Sudanese aid worker. Ms. Sample will discuss the complicated issues of genocide introduced by the play and give insight the continuing issues faced by the Sudanese people and refugees worldwide. IN DARFUR runs from April 20 through May 13, 2017.The Landing Theatre is located at 1119 Providence St, Houston, TX 77002. Tickets are a suggested price of $25, or “Pay-what-you-can”.  For more information, visit http://www.landingtheatre.org/in-darfur. 

 
 
 
“Art: A Visual Language” with Laura Kruger
April 26, 2017 6:30 PM - 8:00 PM
Location Albert & Ethel Herzstein Theater
 
According to Laura Kruger, curator at Hebrew Union College Museum, NYC, art is created for many diverse purposes…. to identify similarities and differences, to capture a visual moment of human experience, to depict size, shape, or mood, to encourage an emotional response to be shared with others, to create a desire for a product, to freeze a moment in time in order to return to it at a later date, are but a few.  Sadly, many of us are intimidated in expressing our responses to a fine art work lest we be judged for our lack of academic knowledge or sophistication. Laura will explain visual art as a powerful means of rapid response to understanding the knowledge and point of view of the artist. The dark silhouette of a city skyline under the blanket of a star sprinkled night is a visual indicator of peace and serenity.  Yet each viewer brings with them their own life baggage, experiences of serenity and calm or anxiety and fear. It is the unspoken conversation of the viewer with the unseen artist that creates each “conversation”.  Admission is free and open to the public, but registration is required at http://www.hmh.org/RegisterEvent.aspx. 

 
 
 
The Boniuk Library Book Club Discussion of “The Nightingale” by Kristin Hannah 
April 25, 2017 6:30 PM - 8:00 PM
Location HMH Conference Room
 
Join The Boniuk Library Book Club as Holocaust Museum Houston librarian Maria Harris facilitates a discussion of “The Nightingale” by Kristin Hannah. This novel tells the story of Vianne and Isabelle, who have always been close despite their differences. Younger, bolder sister Isabelle lives in Paris while Vianne lives a quiet and content life in the French countryside with her husband Antoine and their daughter. When World War II strikes and Antoine is sent off to fight, Vianne and Isabelle's father sends Isabelle to help her older sister cope. As the war progresses, it's not only the sisters' relationship that is tested, but also their strength and their individual senses of right and wrong. With life as they know it changing in unbelievably horrific ways, Vianne and Isabelle will find themselves facing frightening situations and responding in ways they never thought possible as bravery and resistance take different forms in each of their actions. This event is free and open to the public. Visit http://www.hmh.org/RegisterEvent.aspx to RSVP online.  Registration is limited to 12 participants, but the discussion may be offered on a second date. If registration is full, contact Maria Harris at (713) 942-8000, x110 or library@hmh.org to add your name to an interest list.  You can buy the book at http://www.amazon.com/Nightingale-Kristin-Hannah/dp/0312577222/.

 
 
 
Citywide Yom HaShoah Commemoration

April 23, 2017 3:00 PM - 4:00 PM
Location Congregation Beth Israel, 5600 N. Braeswood, Houston, TX 77096
 
Join us for Houston’s annual Yom HaShoah commemorative service in memory of all who died in the Holocaust and to pay tribute to those who survived. The service is free and open to the public. 

 
 
 
"It's Your World - Change It!" – Girl Scouts of San Jacinto Older Girl Workshop
April 22, 2017 10:00 AM - 4:00 PM
Location Avrohm I. Wisenberg Multi-Purpose Learning Center
 
Build a vision for a better world while learning how to stand up and speak out as a social innovator! Girls will complete portions of the GIRLtopia or Bliss Journeys by exploring historical leadership, prejudices and experiences with Holocaust Museum Houston. Seniors and Ambassadors will learn about persecuted populations undergoing social cruelty. In addition to Journey work, girls will learn how to be an advocate for change by earning the "Social Innovator" or "Public Policy" badge. The cost of this program is $20, which includes a Museum tour, program supplies and lunch. For more information, contact the Girl Scouts of San Jacinto Council by email to areinhardt@sjgs.org by phone at 713-292-0338 or email Holocaust Museum Houston at education@hmh.org. Registration closes April 20, 2017. To register, visit https://www.gssjc.org/en/sf-events-repository/2017/holocaust-museum-girltopia-and-bliss-journey.html. Note: This activity is girls-only. Girls may be dropped off for the program. Adults may stay at the Museum if they desire, but will not participate in activities with girls.


 
 
 
Geography & Genocide Teacher Workshop
April 20, 2017 9:00 AM - 4:30 PM
Location Avrohm I. Wisenberg Multi-Purpose Learning Center
 
What is genocide? This term is used in headlines all over the world, but what does it mean? And what can you do to stop it? On Thursday, April 20, 2017, as part of Genocide Awareness Month, Holocaust Museum Houston will provide a one-day workshop examining genocide worldwide. Adam Babiker, a local Darfuri genocide survivor, will speak about Sudan and his experiences as a survivor and a refugee. This workshop will examine current and past genocides, as well as how to teach about this important topic. Using primary source materials, fiction and non-fiction literature, film segments, and art, participants will be prepared to make pedagogical choices as they implement studies related to genocide. Time also will be spent considering the role of the U.S. in genocide prevention, with a focus on how to affect real change from your classroom. This program will meet the TEKS requirements for Social Studies (particularly World History and Geography) and English/Language Arts teachers in grades three through 12. Art and music educators who wish to incorporate these histories in their studies also may wish to consider attending. The fee for this program is $20 per person, which includes workshop materials but not lunch. Registration is limited to 40 teachers and must take place by April 18, 2017.

 
 
 
Civil Liberties: A Community Discussion
April 19, 2017 6:30 PM - 8:00 PM
Location Asia Society 1370 Southmore Blvd. Brown Foundation Auditorium
 
Please join Holocaust Museum Houston for a night of discussion featuring a diverse panel of leaders representing the Anti-Defamation League, American Civil Liberties Union, Emerge-USA Houston, Equality Texas, Holocaust Museum Houston, the Japanese American Citizens League--Houston Chapter, League of United Latin American Citizens and the National Association of the Advancement of Colored People. Drawing on our shared history, the panel remembers human rights abuses—abroad and in America—and stands as a testimony to the dangers of hatred, bigotry, and apathy. We will be discussing the challenges and opportunities facing our community, now and in the future. As the most diverse city in the country, Houston has the unique opportunity to be a leader in inclusion, respect, and empathy.  Admission is free and open to the public, but advance registration is required at http://www.hmh.org/RegisterEvent.aspx.

Co-Sponsored by:



 
 
 
“Defiant Braceros: How Migrant Workers Fought for Racial, Sexual, and Political Freedom” By Dr. Mireya Loza
April 6, 2017 6:30 PM - 8:00 PM
Location Albert & Ethel Herzstein Theater
 
Dr. Mireya Loza, assistant professor, Latino/a Studies at University of Illinois, sheds new light on the private lives of migrant men who participated in the Bracero Program (1942–1964), a binational agreement between the United States and Mexico that allowed hundreds of thousands of Mexican workers to enter this country on temporary work permits. While this program and the issue of temporary workers has long been politicized on both sides of the border, Loza argues that the prevailing romanticized image of braceros as a family-oriented, productive, legal workforce has obscured the real, diverse experiences of the workers themselves.  Basing her work on an archive of more than 800 oral histories from the United States and Mexico, she captures the myriad ways these defiant workers responded to the intense discrimination and exploitation of an unjust system that still persists today.
Book-signing after the lecture. Admission is free and open to the public, but advance registration is required at http://www.hmh.org/RegisterEvent.aspx.

 
 
 
"Be an Upstander!" – Girl Scouts of San Jacinto Cadette Workshop
April 1, 2017 10:00 AM - 4:00 PM
Location Avrohm I. Wisenberg Multi-Purpose Learning Center
 
Get empowered to be a positive force for change! For centuries, people have struggled with peer pressure, bullying, friendship and fitting into their social world. In this workshop, girls will complete portions of the aMAZE Journey by exploring historical leadership, prejudices and experiences in comparison with their modern-day lives. Cadettes will learn about social injustices in our world today. In addition to Journey work, girls will learn how to be an advocate for positivity in their community by earning the "Science of Happiness" badge. The cost of this program is $20, which includes lunch, program supplies and a Museum tour. For more information, contact the Girl Scouts of San Jacinto Council by email to nfrank@sjgs.org, by phone at 713-292-0338 or email Holocaust Museum Houston at education@hmh.org. Registration closes April 7, 2017. To register go to: https://www.gssjc.org/en/sf-events-repository/2017/holocasut-museum-amaze-journey-science-of-happiness.html. Note: This activity is girls-only. Girls may be dropped off for the program. Adults may stay at the Museum if they desire, but will not participate in activities with girls.