NEW CURRICULUM TRUNKS ARE NOW DIGITAL 


For the 2013-2014 academic year, Holocaust Museum Houston's new digitally based iPad2 / iPad mini trunks are the only curriculum trunks available (i.e., the traditional trunks are not available). Each trunk contains either a class set of iPad 2s or iPad minis (30 total per trunk). Each digital device has an individual cover and is pre-loaded with an iBook written by Museum staff, “Exploring the Holocaust & Genocide,” which provides an overview of Holocaust and genocide history connecting to literature and art. There are also links to appropriate Web sites, if your school permits student access to the Internet via outside devices.

Trunks are available on a first-come, first-served basis and will be available to teachers who can pick up the trunks at the Museum during normal business hours.

For the 2013-2014 pilot year, the fee to borrow a trunk is $100. A deposit of $50 must be paid at the time of the confirmation; the balance will be due at the end of the borrowing period. 

For more information or to request a trunk, visit www.hmh.org/ed_cur_trunk.shtml.
 


SOCIAL CRUELTY EXPERT TO ADDRESS ADMINISTRATORS, TEACHERS, COUNSELORS AND PARENTS


Why do many good children treat one another so badly? author and psychologist Dr. Carl Pickhardt will tackle that question on Wednesday, Sept. 11, at 6:30 p.m., at Holocaust Museum Houston. Pickhardt coined the term “social cruelty,” which he defines as “antisocial behavior that serves a social purpose.” His work with adolescents has shown that bullying and other behaviors often exist in “good kids,” and that it is important to know why these behaviors are engaged. His work is relevant to parents, teachers and community leaders who work to address issues of social cruelty – teasing, exclusion, bullying, rumoring and ganging up. Pickhardt has advice for all those targeted and for those engaging in these behaviors. Pickhardt’s book, “Why Good Kids Act Cruel,” was influential in the creation of Holocaust Museum Houston’s “All Behaviors Count” program, which addresses these issues. Tickets are $5 for HMH members and $8 for nonmembers, and seating is limited. To RSVP online, visit www.hmh.org/RegisterEvent.aspx
 


A NOTE ABOUT FIELD TRIPS


Field trips to the Museum truly help to complement a study about the Holocaust. The Museum encourages schools to consider coming to the Museum to learn more about the experiences of survivors who settled in Houston after the World War II. Docent-led tours are provided for groups of 10 or more and are offered free to schools.

Due to space limitations within the Museum, tours may not always be available, however.  Teachers should discuss field trips with their principals and make plans early. Teachers should also keep in mind testing dates and grading periods so that tour dates do not conflict with the school calendar.

To request a field trip, visit http://www.hmh.org/GroupTourRequest.aspx and complete the tour request form. 

There also is a Group and Student Tour Guide that will help teachers prepare students to participate in their docent-led tour. This guide is available at http://www.hmh.org/Uploads/PDF/Group_Student_Tours_Guide.pdf. 


 
UPCOMING PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT


Stefi Altman Seminar for Educators:  "Using Literature Sources
in Holocaust and Genocide Education”
Tuesday, Nov. 19; 2013, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Avrohm I. Wiesenberg Multi-Purpose Learning Center

Do you use the same book or the same author each time you teach about the Holocaust? Do you want to learn how to expand the literary offerings in your teaching and invite rigorous learning via literature with your students? This one-day workshop has been approved by the Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented for five hours in creativity and instructional strategies. The fee for this program is $20 per person, which includes workshop materials but not lunch. Registration is limited to 40 teachers and must take place by Nov. 8, 2013. To learn more and to register online, visit www.hmh.org/RegisterEvent.aspx. 
 
 

 
Paralleled Histories:  The Holocaust, Jim Crow and Japanese-American Internment
Friday, Jan. 24, 2014, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Avrohm I. Wiesenberg Multi-Purpose Learning Center

How do the histories of the Holocaust, the Jim Crow era and Japanese-American internment intersect? During this one-day workshop on Friday, Jan. 24, 2014, teachers can learn how fear, enmity, prejudice and apathy worked together to harm civil societies in Nazi Germany and the United States.
 
This program will meet the TEKS requirements for Social Studies and English/Language Arts teachers in grades 3-12. Art and music educators who wish to incorporate these histories in their studies may also wish to consider attending. The fee for this program is $20 per person, which includes workshop materials but not lunch. Registration is limited to 40 teachers and must take place by Jan. 17, 2014. To RSVP, visit www.hmh.org/RegisterEvent.aspx.
 

 
Genocide Studies 101
Friday, April 11, 2014, 9 a.m. to 9 p.m.
Avrohm I. Wiesenberg Multi-Purpose Learning Center

How did “Never Again” turn into “Ever Again”?
 
On Friday, April 11, 2014, as a part of Genocide Awareness Month, Holocaust Museum Houston will provide a one-day workshop on genocide. 
 
This program will meet the TEKS requirements for Social Studies (particularly World History) and English/Language Arts teachers in grades 3-12. Art and music educators who wish to incorporate these histories in their studies may also wish to consider attending. The fee for this program is $20 per person, which includes workshop materials but not lunch. Registration is limited to 40 teachers and must take place by April 4, 2014. To RSVP, visit www.hmh.org/RegisterEvent.aspx.
 

 
RESOURCE OF THE MONTH


All Behaviors Count
http://www.hmh.org/sc_All_Behaviors_Count.shtml


This Web-based curriculum created and piloted through Holocaust Museum Houston can be used by teachers, counselors, community leaders and others as they confront the behaviors of social cruelty:  taunting, exclusion, rumoring, ganging up and bullying. 

This program is modular – users can focus on specific behaviors and sections – and incorporates Holocaust survivor testimony and media literacy skills. Notably, the program also examines appropriate responses to each of these behaviors and is designed to promote social resiliency. Coming soon for 2013-2014 are additional lessons, a glossary of terms and a section just for parents. 


 
FROM THE COLLECTION

 
Holocaust Museum Houston's “Adopt an Artifact” program allows visitors and school groups to help protect our collections for future generations in an inexpensive way. At only $10 per card, it's easy for a class or group planning a tour to help out.

Danish Rescue Boat
I am the helm of a Danish fishing boat like those used to save Jews in Denmark. My captain would have stood here to ferry six to eight people at a time across stormy, icy seas.

 While the railcar beside me tells the stories of incredible evil committed by ordinary people against their very own neighbors, I teach visitors about the heroic efforts of good people - like the captains of boats like me - who refused to be bystanders and did the right thing, even at the risk of their own lives.

The ordeal began in the first few days of October 1943 when the Germans began a nationwide action to round up all Danish Jews for deportation to the concentration camps. Six percent of Danish Jews were captured, but Denmark’s citizens revolted and helped 7,200 make it safely to Sweden along with 700 non-Jewish relatives. Will you help preserve my history?
Adopt Online
 

MESSAGE FROM THE
EDUCATION DEPARTMENT

The Education Dpartment of Holocaust Museum Houston wishes everyone a wonderful start to the 2013-2014 school year.

The Department worked with 17 teachers – 2 from Poland – during the 2013 Max M. Kaplan Summer Institute for Educators this July. Some of the comments from participants included:

  • "My biggest 'ah-ha' was that the primary focus of education about the Holocaust needs to focus on how the Holocaust was allowed to take place rather than the end result. Only through the "how" can we promise "Never Again!"

  • "It deepened my knowledge about the Holocaust and gave me great ideas for lessons."

  • "I was completely unaware of the number of survivors in the Houston community and how rich of a resource this Museum is for the community (academic and at large)."

  • "I was honored to be able to attend this workshop. I look forward to returning and growing with this community and organization."

    Look for more information about one-day professional development opportunities at the Museum within this newsletter. Information about the 2014 Max M. Kaplan Summer Institute for Educators, including an early registration opportunity, will be announced later this fall.

    If the Museum can help in any way as you prepare your units of study, please let us know at education@hmh.org.

    -- The Education Department


  • Visit our Web site for lesson plans, resources for teaching about the Holocaust and other genocides and information about current exhibitions.  Educators can also order a curriculum trunk, request a docent-led tour or register for public programs offered at the Museum. 
     
     

    The Museum is open 7 days a week. General admission is free.
    Monday to Friday,
    9 a.m. to 5 p.m.

    Saturday and Sunday,
    Noon to 5:00 p.m.

    Map and Directions

    The Museum is a member of the Houston Museum District Association and is located in Houston's Museum District.

    You are receiving this e-mail because you requested updates on events and activities at Holocaust Museum Houston, To ensure delivery to your inbox, please add Holocaustmuseum@hermesemessenger.com to your e-mail address book or "approved senders list."

    Morgan Family Center • 5401 Caroline St. • Houston, TX 77004 • TEL: 713-942-8000 • FAX: 713-942-7953 • E-mail: info@hmh.org

    XXXHERMES_EMAILXXX&WFP=newsletters/present'>Tell a friend
    Unsubscribe

    Morgan Family Center • 5401 Caroline St. • Houston, TX 77004 • TEL: 713-942-8000 • FAX: 713-942-7953 • E-mail: info@hmh.org